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Topic: CHOPIN ETUDE 25/1  (Read 1689 times)

Offline stzorfas

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CHOPIN ETUDE 25/1
on: September 09, 2005, 04:36:06 PM
 In the Cortot edition of the Chopin etudes he recommends simultaneous use of the
una corda pedal with the sustain pedal.  Is this accurate?  How frequently should the  una corda pedal  be used and in which passages should it not be used? 8)

Offline paris

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Re: CHOPIN ETUDE 25/1
Reply #1 on: September 09, 2005, 07:55:27 PM
using una corda all the time is a bit like cheating, don't you think?  ;)
maybe in some parts like pp, or even ppp you can use it, or when one part is repeating, but not during the whole etude.

generally speaking, using una corda for make piano/pianissimo/ppp isn't the best way. real art and achievement is to make pianissimo without any help of u.c. pedal, then, to sound silent but crystal clear.
Critics! If one would be a critic, one should begin with self-criticism !
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Offline stzorfas

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Re: CHOPIN ETUDE 25/1
Reply #2 on: September 09, 2005, 11:19:55 PM
To Paris-  Thanks for your reply.  This is pretty much what I thought too.  I really don't know why Cortot says this?  I will use the una corda for the pp and ppp parts.  If anyone else has any other ideas please let me know. 8)

Offline mrchops10

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Re: CHOPIN ETUDE 25/1
Reply #3 on: September 10, 2005, 02:09:30 AM
I wouldn't call using una corda to play softly cheating at all. However, una corda is about much more than volume. It is most effective when used to change the quality of the sound. The key to any piece, soft or loud, is not "playing really soft," but rather establishing from the beginning a dynamic range that is wide enough to hold interest. For effective color change, use una corda.

To begin any piece with una corda (unless aspecific effect is called for) is generally not a good idea, as the timbre is less inviting to the listener. Consider, too, whether you will play the etude separately or as part of the whole opus. Especially if the latter, do you really want to start out with such a thin tone? I don't think it's good for the audience.
"In the crystal of his harmony he gathered the tears of the Polish people strewn over the fields, and placed them as the diamond of beauty in the diadem of humanity." --The poet Norwid, on Chopin

Offline rob47

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Re: CHOPIN ETUDE 25/1
Reply #4 on: September 10, 2005, 05:40:46 AM
I wouldn't call using una corda to play softly cheating at all. However, una corda is about much more than volume. It is most effective when used to change the quality of the sound. The key to any piece, soft or loud, is not "playing really soft," but rather establishing from the beginning a dynamic range that is wide enough to hold interest. For effective color change, use una corda.

randomly, that's a really good point which made me think. Thanks for that. randomly.

Rob
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-Alexis Weissenberg

Offline mcgillcomposer

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Re: CHOPIN ETUDE 25/1
Reply #5 on: September 10, 2005, 05:55:29 AM
This is a good point about colouristic change using the una corda.  I would also like to point out that colour and volume should also be seperate from the una corda.  If one achieves this, then the una corda can be used as an enhancement factor.  I cannot take credit for this comment however, it is that of Josef Hoffman.

Happy playing!

- Andrew
Asked if he had ever conducted any Stockhausen,Sir Thomas Beecham replied, "No, but I once trod in some."

Offline ted

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Re: CHOPIN ETUDE 25/1
Reply #6 on: September 10, 2005, 07:37:40 AM
The only una corda I use in that one is for those wispy arpeggios at the end. For some reason, and probably incorrectly, I use a completely different touch there than for the rest of the piece. It might be my surroundings at home. Playing in a large hall it wouldn't matter but with a big piano in a small lounge I find it hard to get the contrast in volume I like. Come to think of it I use hardly any una corda at any time in my playing except when my wife has gone to sleep and I want to play something really rowdy.
"We're all bums when the wagon comes." - Waller
 

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