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Lucas Debargue - A Matter of Life or Death
Pianist Lucas Debargue recently recorded the complete piano works of Gabriel Fauré on the Opus 102, a very special grand piano by Stephen Paulello. Eric Schoones from the German/Dutch magazine PIANIST had a conversation with him. Read more >>

Topic: Performance suggestions  (Read 1512 times)

Offline popdog

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Performance suggestions
on: September 12, 2005, 06:24:23 AM
Hey everyone

I have a performance coming up in just under 1 month, and I am just wanting advice on how to perfrom strongly.
The performance is an exam for my end of school music subject.  I have to play a 20-25 minute performance, and my program is as follows (I'll need to play some repeats).

- Bach: Prelude, Bb major, Book 1, no. 22.  (I know everyone thinks its rude not to play the fugue)
- Mozart: 1st Movement, Sonata, F major, K332.
- Albeniz: Malaguena, Op. 165, no. 3
- Mendelssohn: Song without words, Op. 209, no. 3
- Bartok: Sonatina
- Norton: Prelude VII, Latin preludes

Any comments on the programme? 
Any advice for a really strong performance?
I want to research the composers and these pieces, any good websites that anyone knows of?  (I borrowed a few books at the library for some reading)

Any help appreciated,

Popdog.

Offline popdog

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Re: Performance suggestions
Reply #1 on: September 13, 2005, 12:21:50 AM
Anyone?

Offline BoliverAllmon

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Re: Performance suggestions
Reply #2 on: September 13, 2005, 12:35:51 AM
learn to play the pieces in your head. Let the pieces become an extension of your body. don't worry about screwing up. everyone makes some form of mistakes. it doesn't matter.

boliver

Offline kghayesh

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Re: Performance suggestions
Reply #3 on: September 13, 2005, 11:10:48 PM
First, why is most of your pieces just excerpts of complete pieces ( A prelude instead of a P&F, and only 1 movement of a sonata) I think it is better to play 2 or three whole things instead of playing many 'excerpts'.

And concerning the performance, just try to practice well and remember that confidence comes when u r sure that u have practiced well. Just try to imagine the performance itself while u r practicing (the stage, crowds, applauds, bowing.....etc.)
Also, if u can practice at the performance venue that would be excellent too, coz this way u will feel as if u were playing at home.

Just practice your pieces so well and slowly so that u can point out yr weak spots. Concentrate on the weak spots that you are more likely to stumble at. ( BTW here i am not meaning that you will  stumble, i am saying more likely...)

Let us know how it went.

Offline jamie0168

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Re: Performance suggestions
Reply #4 on: September 14, 2005, 12:24:04 AM
ask random people (people you don't know well) to listen to you play. It'll help make you comfortable in a performance situation.

Offline sonatainfsharp

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Re: Performance suggestions
Reply #5 on: September 14, 2005, 01:38:07 AM
I agree on the comment about playing only partial pieces... you can't possibly "know" a piece unless you do the WHOLE thing.  Plus, it helps reach your required time limit, too.

Seriously, a sonata has multiple movements for a reason, as does a grouping of preludes and fugues, etc.

So, take a sonata that has very easy movements and one tough movement, for example.

Just some thoughts.

Offline dmk

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Re: Performance suggestions
Reply #6 on: September 14, 2005, 02:29:05 AM
Hey everyone

I have a performance coming up in just under 1 month, and I am just wanting advice on how to perfrom strongly.
The performance is an exam for my end of school music subject. I have to play a 20-25 minute performance, and my program is as follows (I'll need to play some repeats).

- Bach: Prelude, Bb major, Book 1, no. 22. (I know everyone thinks its rude not to play the fugue)
- Mozart: 1st Movement, Sonata, F major, K332.
- Albeniz: Malaguena, Op. 165, no. 3
- Mendelssohn: Song without words, Op. 209, no. 3
- Bartok: Sonatina
- Norton: Prelude VII, Latin preludes

Any comments on the programme?
Any advice for a really strong performance?
I want to research the composers and these pieces, any good websites that anyone knows of? (I borrowed a few books at the library for some reading)

Any help appreciated,

Popdog.

If your an Aussie (which i have a feeling you are) I am VERY surprised that your piano teacher or even if your school teacher is letting you play a Prelude without a Fugue...I hope this is not for year 11 or 12.  If it is for year 11 and 12 I don't think the Norton is a good selection either.

That said good luck!!! make your friends come over and play in front of them, then invite your family...the more times you practice performing the whole program through
the better.

There are so many good books out there, one book which is really useful for Bartok is

Bartók and the piano : a performer's view by Barbara Nissman, it also has a CD in it if I remember correctly.  You may have to go to a uni library to find it though

Cheers

dmk
"Music is the wine that fills the cup of silence"
Robert Fripp

Offline pianowelsh

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Re: Performance suggestions
Reply #7 on: September 21, 2005, 11:47:56 PM
dont worry about only playing a bit of a piece. You can come back and finish off the other movements later. it is kind of annoying how exams and stuff often railroad you into doing only certain movements though. Sounds like your teacher wants to show off your range and breadth of play! for the spanish pieces steep yourself in the folk music of Spain and get a real feel for the latin rhythms - this is vital to their success as is subtle use of pedal and exquistie chord voicing - get your teacher to help you with this. I actually agree with the prelude only Bach (the fugue is frankly a bit boring and the prelude is genius!) keep it light and bubbling like a brook -full of energy - especially if it is the first thing your audience will hear - Arrest them! Keep it clear too (depends on hall/piano but i would hardly go near the pedal here). Mozart REALLy know your sonata structure well ( i would go as far as to colour code your themes) Know your modulations and dont just know em - show em! find ways of varying your tone colour so that you take your listeners on an exciting harmonic journey. Mendelssohn is rel straightforward to bring off - listen to lots of the songs without words - get a mental picture or a poem that you feel expresses the piece well and have that in your mind as you practice - you'll discover lots by doing this! Bartok look at all the influences on this piece - look at the formal structure of it - clue - its interesting! Look at Bartoks interest in folk music and his obsession with numbers - it will help you to understand the piece - bear in mind the rhythmic energy of the piece is important and find some really strong and contrasting colours. Dont know the Norton im afraid but im guessing its a very rythmic and possibly latin/jazz inspired piece - get recordings of latin combos and jazz fusion artists listen to the kinds of sounds they are making particularly how they voice chords.
You should aim to memorize the lot it makes the performance look so much stronger! consider the appropriateness ofyour stage manner ie bowing etc but also how you play Albeniz and how you approach Bartok - you may want to physically demonstrate their differences. Biggest advice is enjoy your pieces and enjoy your audience - share the music with them and dont get too bogged down - oh i wonder what they are thinking etc PERFORM - consider introducing your pieces (takes a bit of extra time and bridges the gap between you and your audience!)
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