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Scriabin Etude Op 42 No 5 (Read 5432 times)

Offline Triton

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Scriabin Etude Op 42 No 5
« on: September 18, 2005, 03:50:00 PM »
Well..Here's me playing it..
What do you think of it?

Thanks to Elizabeth for bringing the sheets for this piece ;)

Triton

Offline palika dunno

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Re: Scriabin Etude Op 42 No 5
«Reply #1 on: September 18, 2005, 05:22:21 PM »
well done  :) yeah really good. I especially liked it from two minutes to the end. the first to minutes are of course more quiet and there are less notes but why not play them as expressive as the louder and heavier parts? there should just be a bit more dynamics in the beginning for my taste! your pedaling is awesome. everything is very clear but very free! how long have you been playing the piano, how old are you and on what instrument is this recording made?

regards
palika  :)

Offline gorbee natcase

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Re: Scriabin Etude Op 42 No 5
«Reply #2 on: September 18, 2005, 08:45:39 PM »
I think it was a petrof I enjoyed it  :)
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(> <)      What ever Bernhard said

Offline pita bread

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Re: Scriabin Etude Op 42 No 5
«Reply #3 on: September 18, 2005, 10:19:51 PM »
I enjoyed your articulation, especially in the second half of the piece. The voices are all very clear, and your rubato flows well.

However, now that you've mastered all the articulations and clarity, you need to focus on lightening some of the inner voices, and putting more emphasis on the leading melodies. I think the inner voices need to still remain articulate, but make them more of an eerie "shimmer." After you do that, add some speed and your performance will be breathtaking.

Offline Triton

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Re: Scriabin Etude Op 42 No 5
«Reply #4 on: September 19, 2005, 05:18:21 PM »
Thanks everyone!

Yes i play on a Petrof.

I have been playing for about 7-8 years now i think, and I am 16 years old.

I enjoyed your articulation, especially in the second half of the piece. The voices are all very clear, and your rubato flows well.

However, now that you've mastered all the articulations and clarity, you need to focus on lightening some of the inner voices, and putting more emphasis on the leading melodies. I think the inner voices need to still remain articulate, but make them more of an eerie "shimmer." After you do that, add some speed and your performance will be breathtaking.

Thanks for the advice pita bread! I'll work on it ;)



People!
I want more reviews!
You're welcome to write here ;)

Triton

Offline palika dunno

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Re: Scriabin Etude Op 42 No 5
«Reply #5 on: September 19, 2005, 06:02:35 PM »
Quote
People!
I want more reviews!

I want more of your playing. I like it somehow  :)

palika  :)

Offline chopiabin

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Re: Scriabin Etude Op 42 No 5
«Reply #6 on: September 20, 2005, 04:38:36 PM »
I like your recording a lot, but my advice would be (as hard as the piece is) to speed it up a bit. Sometimes the melodic line seems to get lost (especially near the beginning) because the piece feels a little draggy.

Offline stevie

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Re: Scriabin Etude Op 42 No 5
«Reply #7 on: September 21, 2005, 03:52:37 AM »
i have to admit, i prefer gavrilov.

are you pl;aying it so slowly out of necessity or thats your actual chosen interpretation?

Offline da jake

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Re: Scriabin Etude Op 42 No 5
«Reply #8 on: September 21, 2005, 06:23:26 AM »
The right hand for that piece is apparently astonishingly difficult.

Nice performance, but really should be faster.
"The best discourse upon music is silence" - Schumann

Offline Triton

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Re: Scriabin Etude Op 42 No 5
«Reply #9 on: September 21, 2005, 09:56:21 AM »
Thanks everyone.

To be honest, i thought i played the piece faster, but when i heard the results, i see what you mean.
Well..Well. Yeah thanks i'll post some more ;)

Triton

Offline gaer

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Re: Scriabin Etude Op 42 No 5
«Reply #10 on: September 23, 2005, 08:38:04 AM »
As several people have pointed out, your performance is very slow. Add to that the fact that this piece is so famous and it's easy to see why people are expecting more speed.

But here's what I REALLY like, as a teacher. You are playing within your limits, now, and there are a great many expressive ideas that are already working. I would NOT speed it up, not one bit— not now. Play it just as you are, continue shaping it. If you can, imagine it faster in your mind, and plan how you would like to shape it at a faster tempo. But don't force it now.

There is a great deal to be said for playing something under tempo and working on ideas. Most people who are at the point that I judge you to be at, at this moment, would push beyond their present abilities and would blur, fake and even lose dynamics through pushing the tempo too soon. Your playing is honest, clean, and we can hear all the notes. You have good ideas, so it is not mechanical sounding.

You might put it away soon, take it out every few months, after playing many other things, to see if advances you make in other literature can be transferred to this piece, later. I do agree that you need more tempo. I just disagree about attempting to make this happen at the present time. You have the rest of your life to accelerate fast pieces. One point to keep in mind: you always need a good teacher to make sure that the movements you are using at a reduced tempo are going to work later on. I assume you have a good teacher. Few people play as well as you do at your age without excellent instruction. (Almost none…)

By the way, you have all the power you need, if you can keep it and accelerate the piece with the same energy (later) without cramping or tightening, you'll have great passion, but I fully agree with the idea of concentrating on lightening up whatever is harmonic but not part of melody or counter-melody. This will do two things immediately: first, when you  accent heavily in the climaxes, it will have more "punch" (contrast), and it may immediately give you a bit more tempo (without even trying for it), because you can relax the hands more when you choose your "moments". :)

Well done. I enjoyed it!

Gary

Offline Dazzer

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Re: Scriabin Etude Op 42 No 5
«Reply #11 on: September 23, 2005, 08:44:27 AM »
http://www.pianostreet.com/smf/index.php/topic,8823.0.html

My own rendition on the site.

It seems there might be some score-reading errors ... or maybe a different edition. I might have to check my own edition.

I must say you really brought out the innner voices well.
Me? A Piano-monkey? I'm not good enough to be one. - Dazzer's thoughts on piano monkeys.
The last recording i did was Etude in A Flat. It would have sounded better in A Hall though.
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Offline wzkit

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Re: Scriabin Etude Op 42 No 5
«Reply #12 on: September 23, 2005, 07:00:58 PM »
As several people have pointed out, your performance is very slow. Add to that the fact that this piece is so famous and it's easy to see why people are expecting more speed.

But here's what I REALLY like, as a teacher. You are playing within your limits, now, and there are a great many expressive ideas that are already working. I would NOT speed it up, not one bit— not now. Play it just as you are, continue shaping it. If you can, imagine it faster in your mind, and plan how you would like to shape it at a faster tempo. But don't force it now.

There is a great deal to be said for playing something under tempo and working on ideas. Most people who are at the point that I judge you to be at, at this moment, would push beyond their present abilities and would blur, fake and even lose dynamics through pushing the tempo too soon. Your playing is honest, clean, and we can hear all the notes. You have good ideas, so it is not mechanical sounding.

You might put it away soon, take it out every few months, after playing many other things, to see if advances you make in other literature can be transferred to this piece, later. I do agree that you need more tempo. I just disagree about attempting to make this happen at the present time. You have the rest of your life to accelerate fast pieces. One point to keep in mind: you always need a good teacher to make sure that the movements you are using at a reduced tempo are going to work later on. I assume you have a good teacher. Few people play as well as you do at your age without excellent instruction. (Almost none…)

By the way, you have all the power you need, if you can keep it and accelerate the piece with the same energy (later) without cramping or tightening, you'll have great passion, but I fully agree with the idea of concentrating on lightening up whatever is harmonic but not part of melody or counter-melody. This will do two things immediately: first, when you  accent heavily in the climaxes, it will have more "punch" (contrast), and it may immediately give you a bit more tempo (without even trying for it), because you can relax the hands more when you choose your "moments". :)

Well done. I enjoyed it!

Gary

Very well put. My sentiments exactly