Piano Forum



The Chopin Method – A Master Deep Dive
The independent educational project “The Chopin Method” aims to bring Chopin’s technical ideas to a wider audience. By using biomechanical animations and new anatomical references, its creator Dr. Claudio Saavedra presents a series of videos which brings new light on Chopin’s views on piano playing. Read more >>

Topic: Beethoven's Appasionata  (Read 2618 times)

Offline marc

  • PS Silver Member
  • Newbie
  • ***
  • Posts: 2
Beethoven's Appasionata
on: August 10, 2003, 08:02:59 PM
dear all,

I am currently studying the third movement of the third movement of Beethoven's appasionata sonata. I had some discussion with my piano teacher about the tempo. She prefers a quite slow tempo (about 110/120) and I personally enjoy a faster one. Anyway, Beethoven says : "Allegro ma non troppo" but It is perhaps less passionate with a slow tempo (?). I appreciate the fast interpretation like the one of the french pianist Yves Nat (about 150). The problem is that it is for me very difficult, and even more to play so fast !

Do you know the tempo of other famous pianists (Brendel, Serkin, Arrau, Barenboïm, Kempff, etc.)? What is your personal feeling about this?

Thank you very much for your answers and sorry for the bad english of a french pianist !

Marc


Offline tph

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 64
Re: Beethoven's Appasionata
Reply #1 on: August 10, 2003, 08:39:11 PM
Quote
dear all,

Do you know the tempo of other famous pianists (Brendel, Serkin, Arrau, Barenboïm, Kempff, etc.)? What is your personal feeling about this?


I have an excellent recording by the Canadian pianist Anton Kuerti, who takes the last mov't at around 112-116, and then really takes off in the Presto.  The "ma non troppo" makes for a very haunting quality.  Kuerti describes it very well in his notes:

"It is quiet but chilling, like waves in the middle of the ocean.  Over this rises a series of desolate, penetrating cries, separated by gasp-like rests.... [T]he accompaniment continues to trickle on, accumulating more and more energy like water building  up behind a dam that must eventually burst."

I guess if you can learn to play it at any speed, then you can choose your tempo according to your mood.

Votre anglais est formidable!

tph

Offline BuyBuy

  • PS Silver Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 178
Re: Beethoven's Appasionata
Reply #2 on: August 11, 2003, 04:28:10 PM
Richter plays it quite fast too. It's storm like

Horowitz plays a medium tempo, but when the coda starts, boy, let me tell you, you better fasten your seat belt... Now that's a coda !

Offline e60m5

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 369
Re: Beethoven's Appasionata
Reply #3 on: August 11, 2003, 06:25:00 PM
When I play the Appassionata myself, I feel that the last movement should indeed be played fast.

Upon hearing other interpretations of the last movement taken at slower speeds, the last movement ceases to be a terrifying storm of anger and passion and becomes pretty dull and empty.

The name "Appassionata", apparently taken with this last movement in mind, does not quite seem to fit the slow, pedestrian pace interpretations that seem to be all too common nowadays.

However, this is just my own opinion. I respect the interpretations and choices of others - when I play, however, I choose not to listen to them, and only to myself, as to how the music should be played.

My tempo I am not sure of the metronome count, but it is above 150. If anyone wants, I can find my clock speed for this piece... I'm performing it as part of a 70 minute recital later this month.

Offline eddie92099

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1816
Re: Beethoven's Appasionata
Reply #4 on: August 11, 2003, 07:14:48 PM
Has anyone heard Myra Hess' recording. I have the video and it is extraordinarily fast and very exciting,
Ed

Offline shas

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 99
Re: Beethoven's Appasionata
Reply #5 on: August 26, 2003, 09:38:49 AM
Personnlly I love how Vlandimir Ashkenazy plays it, It's the first recording I everheard and have loved it ever since along with him playing the moonlight and the Pathetique as well as the Emperers concerto and piano cocerto in G major.
I onlly wish I cauld play the Appassionata ( I envy you ghys who can). I'm curently working on the Pathetique (1st mouvment) and I must say with some diffulculty even there. I would appreciate any addvice anyone cauld give on learning it.
Sharma Yelverton

Offline pskim

  • PS Silver Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 124
Re: Beethoven's Appasionata
Reply #6 on: August 27, 2003, 06:08:00 PM
I have also heard many recordings of this wonderful sonata and I really like the interpretation of Murray Perahia.  I really like the tempo that he takes, especially the third movement.  Try and give it a listen.

Offline Beethoven87

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 49
Re: Beethoven's Appasionata
Reply #7 on: August 28, 2003, 02:33:34 AM
I agree with shas...  Ashkenazy does about the best Appasionata I've heard.  I can't say for sure what the tempo was, though.  I didn't really like his Waldstein, now that I think about it.  Another good one for most any Beethoven Sonata is Goode.  Especially the Waldstein...
Et cetera

Offline shas

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 99
Re: Beethoven's Appasionata
Reply #8 on: August 28, 2003, 05:04:28 AM
Man isn't Beethoven extrodinery
Sharma Yelverton

Offline Roastie_FC

  • PS Silver Member
  • Newbie
  • ***
  • Posts: 21
Re: Beethoven's Appasionata
Reply #9 on: August 28, 2003, 03:48:05 PM
that piece is too long
Piano - Symbol of Mystery, Passion, Power & Glory
For more information about this topic, click search below!
 

Logo light pianostreet.com - the website for classical pianists, piano teachers, students and piano music enthusiasts.

Subscribe for unlimited access

Sign up

Follow us

Piano Street Digicert