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Topic: Left hand technique.  (Read 3511 times)

Offline musicmaker18

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Left hand technique.
on: August 23, 2003, 06:25:53 AM
I am a composer and I am trying to improve my left hand technique.  How does someone write the left hand part?  I know you can use chords, but how would they use a melodic interval kind of technique.

I am new to music theory, so don't laugh if I made a mistake.
"To dream and not have the dream come true is better than not having dreamt at all." - Kayla

NetherMagic

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Re: Left hand technique.
Reply #1 on: August 23, 2003, 08:01:29 AM
well musicmaker I'm assuming you're trying to learn how to be better at both using the LH to play music better and be better at composing the accompaniment for your music.

Btw, are you planning to compose pop-style or classical style music?

And since you are new to music theory, I suggest you take theory lessons.  In addition to that, analyze different pieces by different composers such as Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Chopin, Debussy, etc., on how their pieces are like, their styles, and how they fit their compose their rhythms and accompaniment

Offline musicmaker18

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Re: Left hand technique.
Reply #2 on: August 23, 2003, 08:25:05 AM
Quote
well musicmaker I'm assuming you're trying to learn how to be better at both using the LH to play music better and be better at composing the accompaniment for your music.

Btw, are you planning to compose pop-style or classical style music?

And since you are new to music theory, I suggest you take theory lessons.  In addition to that, analyze different pieces by different composers such as Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Chopin, Debussy, etc., on how their pieces are like, their styles, and how they fit their compose their rhythms and accompaniment
I am a classical composer.

I am also just getting music analyzing.  I have analyzed a piece by Beethoven, his Minuet.  

I am very excited about going further in my music theory.  
"To dream and not have the dream come true is better than not having dreamt at all." - Kayla

Offline Irock1ce

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Re: Left hand technique.
Reply #3 on: August 23, 2003, 10:01:01 AM
Bach is usually good for analysis... since most of the time his music doesnt have the super crazy weirdness that a lot of romantic composers along with beethoven+mozart have.... but i remember when i was in theory at UCB, we did some bach... and we did realllly simple mozart..  and we did the first 2 pages of Beethoven Waldstein. but check those out.. once you can anaylze those kind of pieces with ease... since it seems like u might just be starting... start composing using perhaps a style like bachs. or mozarts. mess around with the whole alberti bass thing. or set an example chord set. something like I-IV-vii-ii-V-I. Pick a key and just start off with arpeggios, notes in those chords and then start to add Neighboring Tones, Passing Tones, etc etc. Perhaps do a repeat and do a Half Cadence to end the first half and end the 2nd with a PAC. or do the first half with a Deceptive. But yeah.. these are just things i remember from theory class... gl.
Member of Young Musicians program at University of California, Berkeley.

Offline musicmaker18

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Re: Left hand technique.
Reply #4 on: August 23, 2003, 09:45:55 PM
Yeah, the last lesson I had we were just getting started in that.  Exactly how does I-IV-vii-ii-V-I work?  

Let's say that we are in the key of C.  Wouldn't ii be D or something like that?
"To dream and not have the dream come true is better than not having dreamt at all." - Kayla

Offline bachopoven

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Re: Left hand technique.
Reply #5 on: August 27, 2003, 06:40:19 PM
Maybe this will help in Roman Numeral Analysis among many other theory basics:

https://www.musictheory.net/load.php?id=44
"In the beginning was rhythm." - Haydn.
 

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