Piano Forum



The End of an Era: Keith Jarrett's Return to his Roots
Keith Jarrett, one of the greatest musicians and profilistic pianists of our time, has recently announced that he will no longer be able to hold up his career as a performer. Now 75, he suffered a pair of draining strokes two years ago that left his left side paralyzed and resulting in an unability to play the piano. The recently released "Budapest Concert" - a return to his grandparents' native country Hungary - is likely one of Jarrett's final recorded public solo piano recitals. Read more >>

Topic: Latin Jazz?  (Read 2329 times)

Offline shas

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 99
Latin Jazz?
on: August 26, 2003, 09:19:44 AM
Is this site strictlly limeted to Classical music (which I love) or can include questions about other styles?
Does anyone play jazz or latin jazz piano. I'm espeacally fond of Eddie Palmieri's music as well as Herby Hancock, Chick Corea, Bud Powel etc..
Also does anyone know a jazz solo piece cauld "Tempus Fugue-It (Tempus Fugit) by Bud Powell (Ithink) and even better can anyone play it? ;)
Sharma Yelverton

Offline BuyBuy

  • PS Silver Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 178
Re: Latin Jazz?
Reply #1 on: August 26, 2003, 03:46:17 PM
No, this is not limited strictly to Classical. However, you'll fin out soon enough that most of us know and discuss much more of Classical than anything else...

About Latin jazz, what do you think of Rubén González? He's old, but he's still got it, I think.

Offline shas

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 99
Re: Latin Jazz?
Reply #2 on: August 26, 2003, 08:43:44 PM
I think he's great and in genrall the older they are the more expirienced they get. Ediie Palmieri must be getting on a bit too now.
Incedently do you know who Jack Costanzo's current pianoist is? I got the CD copied and don't have any info about it.
Sharma Yelverton

Offline Eek Lek Tik

  • PS Silver Member
  • Newbie
  • ***
  • Posts: 19
Re: Latin Jazz?
Reply #3 on: December 09, 2003, 09:22:34 PM
Tempus Fugit is in this book:

https://changingtones.com/gerandsz/bdpowell.html

I haven't played it but I play several of his tunes and solos. The transcriptions are good but you need to listen to the recordings to get it right.

If you like Latin jazz piano,  get anything by Michel Camilo and see him live if possible.  He stunned everyone at the Monterey Jazz festival last September.

Recommended Camilo recordings:

Rendezvous (my fave)
On Fire
Suntan
..and all the rest
Everyone's different. I am the same.

Offline Eek Lek Tik

  • PS Silver Member
  • Newbie
  • ***
  • Posts: 19
Ruben Gonzalez Dies
Reply #4 on: December 12, 2003, 09:40:59 PM
Everyone's different. I am the same.

Offline shas

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 99
Re: Latin Jazz?
Reply #5 on: December 19, 2003, 03:34:04 PM
man I saw Buena Vista Social Club,  at the last glaston bury festival. yes they wer grate.
by the way Eddie Palmieri rules!
Sharma Yelverton

NetherMagic

  • Guest
Re: Latin Jazz?
Reply #6 on: December 21, 2003, 09:02:14 AM
I love jazz but unfortunately I'm not really good at it.

It's hard to get into improv and solos after playing classical for years.  I guess that's the downside of classical music for the general majority, you just lose some of that creativity.  But I'm gettin' better =]

and Camilo is amazing =]

Offline shas

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 99
Re: Latin Jazz?
Reply #7 on: December 30, 2003, 01:41:56 AM
Just keep trying. It's more of a psycelogical thing than anything else.
Your probly a far better pianist than I am haveing onlly played for a whil But it's crazy too say and problly quite true to say theat I's a more competent improviser seeing that istarted with jazz. Your case isn't uncomen. you need to use your classical technique to your advantege but free your mind from the restrictions of writen music.
Start off just messing about with a scale or monde then play over a few chords in a seaquence. Also It's very usefull to transcribe other peoples solo's because it developes your ear and gives you ideas as to what to use.
Sharma Yelverton

Offline Eek Lek Tik

  • PS Silver Member
  • Newbie
  • ***
  • Posts: 19
Re: Latin Jazz?
Reply #8 on: December 30, 2003, 08:58:59 AM
"Thinking in Jazz" by Paul Berliner is a good book that deals more with the learning process and mental side of jazz improvisation. In addtion to the many technical books ("The Jazz Piano book", "Connecting Chords with Linear Harmony", "Harmonic Foundation for Jazz and Popular Music"  etc..) you can learn the theory. But as was previously posted,  play, play, play. Pick out as many tunes as you can by ear and come up with different harmonies. Get a fake book and just start in on it. And listen to as much music of the genre as you possilby can. It's been a long road for me but a road unltimately more fascinating and satisfying than the oher genres.
Everyone's different. I am the same.

Offline Daevren

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 700
Re: Latin Jazz?
Reply #9 on: January 01, 2004, 04:52:26 AM
Guitarist Al Di Meola did some nice latin jazz/fusion stuff. He is a bit like Chick cause he played in Chick's Return to Forever band. Later he turned even more latin. Inspired by Piazzolla the accordion player.  He also turned acoustic.

Offline shas

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 99
Re: Latin Jazz?
Reply #10 on: February 27, 2004, 08:40:41 PM
Hey, I just got the Sher music production"101 Montunos" the latin piano book, I would strongly recomend it, It comes with 2 free CD's as well which I never realised befour.
Sharma Yelverton
For more information about this topic, click search below!
 

Logo light pianostreet.com - the website for classical pianists, piano teachers, students and piano music enthusiasts.

Subscribe for unlimited access

Sign up

Follow us

Piano Street Digicert