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Topic: Memorization  (Read 3275 times)

Offline chsmike2345

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Memorization
on: September 03, 2003, 06:52:25 AM
I'm practicing for the Yamaha competition. The problem I seem to be having is memorization, as one short piece (Rachmaninoff Prelude #1 f# minor and 4 pages) is taking me a few days to memorize. At this rate, I will finish memorizing just before the competition date, October 14, and that won't be good for the performance and my mind set. Any suggestions on how to memorize faster or just methods of memorization?

Offline allchopin

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Re: Memorization
Reply #1 on: September 04, 2003, 02:31:03 AM
Its probably not a very good idea to be starting to memorize a piece just before a competition, but i guess you know what youre doing...
What i occaisionally do to speed up memorization is pretend theres someone by me on another piano, learning the same piece you are.  I try to "compete" with him/her by learning it the fastest.  That way, there imaginary incentive to think fast.  But if that doesnt work (more like when), try memorizing in chunks.  Dont just run the whole piece all the time.  Thats harder.
A modern house without a flush toilet... uncanny.

Offline chsmike2345

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Re: Memorization
Reply #2 on: September 04, 2003, 03:11:38 AM
What do you mean I shouldn't memorize just before a competition? Am I supposed to use pieces I have memorized already? I play pieces just for the competition, as my teacher sees fit... anyway..
I do memorize in chunks, but the problem is that once i get one chunk memorized the previous chunk that was kind of similar is forgotten, as my fingers confuse the two chunks. Suggestions?

Offline allchopin

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Re: Memorization
Reply #3 on: September 04, 2003, 04:03:55 AM
Umm maybe i am just overestimating the competition, but i would think that you should know the piece well before the competiiton.  
Yes i have that same memorization problem with one of my pieces (a mazurka...).  Just play the parts constantly, and try not to refer back to the music very much.  I dont really konw how else memorization can be taught, but i can say that youre not the only one.
A modern house without a flush toilet... uncanny.

Offline BoliverAllmon

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Re: Memorization
Reply #4 on: September 04, 2003, 04:33:34 PM
here's my suggestion, drop the competition. You do learn pieces for competition, but you have them memorized well before you even start to put the whole thing together. You must learn the notes before putting them together to make a piece. You should of had the piece memorized long time ago. At this stage of the game you should be doing mental pratice and polishing the work.

boliver

Offline eddie92099

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Re: Memorization
Reply #5 on: September 04, 2003, 06:57:46 PM
I would disagree with Boliver - and can also name many instances of pianists learning a piece as close as the night before (Ogdon was once 'phoned in New York by London suggesting he step in for an indisposed pianist - Ogdon accepted but hadn't ever played the work before so he bought the score and learnt it from memory on the 'plane without a keyboard and played it the next day in London!). On a reality-based level though, I often complete memorisation of a piece days before the concert/competition - of course the musical aspects are in place from day 1 though,
Ed

Offline BoliverAllmon

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Re: Memorization
Reply #6 on: September 05, 2003, 05:52:04 AM
Your feelings may come out somewhat from day one of playing the piano, but they will never come out to there fullest until you let the piece become an extension of your fingers. The only way to let this happen is to clear your mind of all non-essential things, this includes thinking about sight-reading.

boliver

Offline jakester

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Re: Memorization
Reply #7 on: September 05, 2003, 05:34:29 PM
Boliver - I have to disagree on that one. Music can come out no matter what you're thinking of, though often what does come out is what you're thinking of. A great sightreader doesn't only sightreads well, but also plays as well while he's sightreading (and as musically) as he would if he's completely memorized the piece. Playing with music or without (aside from the ancient argument) should make no difference as to a person's musicality, given a sufficient amount of talent.
The world without a pianist. That would be paradise. The world without a piano. That would be hell.

Offline BoliverAllmon

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Re: Memorization
Reply #8 on: September 05, 2003, 05:45:57 PM
That's the question do you have the talent? can you commit whole-heartedly to the feelings and still have the concentration to sight-read? I am not saying you can't make the piece sound good, but can you do your best for a competition?

boliver

Offline BoliverAllmon

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Re: Memorization
Reply #9 on: September 05, 2003, 06:08:28 PM
Back to the original question. I think the biggest problem with memorization is trying to memorize to big of chunks. Try to memorize each phrase or even each measure at a time. See if that helps. Also, if you can memorize it just a days before competition and do fine then great. I do give this to you. My mom can't play unless she has sheet music in front of her. I on the other hand feel as if I can't play up to par unless I focus completely on the music and my hands. This means piece memorized, head down watching piano and hands.

boliver

Offline DaNiElLe

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Re: Memorization
Reply #10 on: September 07, 2003, 11:32:11 AM
hey guys

my piano teacher taught me this method of memorizing the articulation and dynamics of a piece and it works really well with everyone thats tried it.

shade the score with colored pencils in the following way:

Loud - Red (the louder it gets, the darker you shade)
Soft - Blue (the softer it gets, the lighter yiu shade)
sf's/strong accents - Purple (shade it really dark so that it stands out)

then highlight the articulation (slurs, staccatos etc...but DONT highlight ties because they could be mistaken for slurs)

do this before you start learning each song. that way you always know what the dynamics and articulation are even when your practicing. When you go to perform the piece, all you  have to remember is the colors. If you can picture the colors in the right order you should remember quite easily.

Danielle

Offline eddie92099

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Re: Memorization
Reply #11 on: September 07, 2003, 01:39:08 PM
Suppose we are capable of producing more than three dynamic levels though,
Ed

Offline jakester

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Re: Memorization
Reply #12 on: September 07, 2003, 05:19:01 PM
Quote
Suppose we are capable of producing more than three dynamic levels though,
Ed


Word.
The world without a pianist. That would be paradise. The world without a piano. That would be hell.

Offline thracozaag

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Re: Memorization
Reply #13 on: September 08, 2003, 05:11:29 PM
Quote
hey guys

my piano teacher taught me this method of memorizing the articulation and dynamics of a piece and it works really well with everyone thats tried it.

shade the score with colored pencils in the following way:

Loud - Red (the louder it gets, the darker you shade)
Soft - Blue (the softer it gets, the lighter yiu shade)
sf's/strong accents - Purple (shade it really dark so that it stands out)

then highlight the articulation (slurs, staccatos etc...but DONT highlight ties because they could be mistaken for slurs)

do this before you start learning each song. that way you always know what the dynamics and articulation are even when your practicing. When you go to perform the piece, all you  have to remember is the colors. If you can picture the colors in the right order you should remember quite easily.

Danielle


 Good Lord. :-[
"We have to reach a certain level before we realize how small we are."--Georges Cziffra
 

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