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Chopin Competition Aftermath: Breakfast with Tony Yang
Many have enjoyed the Chopin Competition performances live and via streaming and the “now factor” has been very well provided for. But what about after-Warsaw? During his visit to Warsaw, Patrick Jovell had a breakfast talk with laureate 2015 Tony Yang, the youngest prize winner ever – in the history of the competition. Read more >>

Topic: Beethoven  (Read 2006 times)

Offline Mandy

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Beethoven
on: May 25, 2002, 06:24:39 AM
I'm working on Beethoven's Sonata op.2 no.3 and was wondering how people are doing the double thirds, right at the beginning of the first movement.  Is it a no-no to do them with both hands?

Any suggestions would be great!-Thanks

Offline ludwig

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Re: Beethoven
Reply #1 on: May 27, 2002, 04:14:59 PM
Yeah, I suppose if you play the thirds with two hands, you are not going to sustain the left hand except by means of the pedal. I like to play it in my RH with 1 5 and then 2 4 alternating,until the last C E I'd swap to the 1 3 to play B D followed by the B G. Does that make sense? hmmm...  ???
"Classical music snobs are some of the snobbiest snobs of all. Often their snobbery masquerades as helpfulnes... unaware that they are making you feel small in order to make themselves feel big..."ÜÜÜ

Offline rmc7777

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Re: Beethoven
Reply #2 on: May 28, 2002, 04:55:02 PM
Mandy, there are no absolutes in music so there might be several ways to play this, one of which was described by Ludwig.  I think I would keep it simple.  I assume you're referring to the thirds in measures one and three.  I would use 1-3 and 2-4 in measure one, and 2-3 and 1-4 in measure three.  You'll find this fingering in the Shenker edition - and I agree with it.  I probably would not use the sustain pedal in these measures, just hold the bass in the left hand and play the thirds in the right hand.  If you have trouble playing the thirds in one hand Allegro con brio, then you might want to spend some time with Hanon exercises, which contain a lot of work for thirds.  

Offline Mandy

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Re: Beethoven
Reply #3 on: June 01, 2002, 04:25:53 AM
thanks ludwig and rmc7777-I tried both and found the 1-3, 2-4...2-3, 1-4 to be the easiest one........I think I will have to dig out my Hanon book, I didn't realize how rusty I was playing these! ;)

Offline ludwig

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Re: Beethoven
Reply #4 on: June 01, 2002, 05:04:47 AM
that's alright :) actually my edition also says to play them 14 and 23 but I guess I don't have long fingers, and my 4th finger's a weak weak, so i'm using 15 and 24. :) goodluck, I'm also learning Beethoven's sontas, but later ones. Beethoven's good, hence the name.  ;D
"Classical music snobs are some of the snobbiest snobs of all. Often their snobbery masquerades as helpfulnes... unaware that they are making you feel small in order to make themselves feel big..."ÜÜÜ

Offline Beethoven3

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Re: Beethoven
Reply #5 on: June 04, 2002, 09:43:58 PM
yes

i am a experienced piano player for nine years and i must say that if you think it doesn't sound right or that it is a no no, then you should go with whatever you think ;D because without your joy at the piano and the wonderful feelings you experience, the piano is nothing but a chore when you're practicing.thankyou

Offline MikeThePianist

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Re: Beethoven
Reply #6 on: August 07, 2002, 07:48:14 AM
I haven't learned the piece yet, but would love to in the near future.  Although I think it would be great to develop the technique to play the double thirds in the RH alone, if it doesn't happen, or if it puts some strain on you, forget about it and use the LH too.  Why make Beethoven harder than it needs to be just because you can't hold bass line the full count?  Which part is more important?  

Mike
Michael Fauver is pursuing his bachelors degree in piano performance at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor.

Offline trunks

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Re: Beethoven
Reply #7 on: April 08, 2004, 12:07:01 AM
Try adopt to my suggested fingering, which I think is the most natural:
2-4(opening), 1-3, 2-4, 1-3, 2-4, 3-5, 2-4, 1-3 . . .

Practise the double-trill "1-3, 2-4, 1-3, 2-4 . . ." beginning on slow tempo gradually increasing speed, adding the final 3-5 every time you end the trill.

Then practise "1-3, 2-4, 3-5, 2-4, 1-3, 2-4, 3-5, 2-4 . . .", also starting from slow tempo.

Hope that helps!
Peter (Hong Kong)
part-time piano tutor
amateur classical concert pianist
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