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Topic: Abbreviations in Mozart Sonata K283  (Read 4155 times)

Offline atticus

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Abbreviations in Mozart Sonata K283
on: November 30, 2005, 09:34:34 PM
Hi all,

Can anyone tell me what the abbreviations "m.d." and "m.s." mean in Mozart's K283?  The abbrev.'s are in measure 30 and 31.

Thanks,
atticus
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Offline radiant

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Re: Abbreviations in Mozart Sonata K283
Reply #1 on: November 30, 2005, 10:44:57 PM
Hm... I cannot find the point where there are such abbreviations in my score of this sonata. According to my score-reading experience, they seem to be:
m.d. = "mano destra" = right hand
m.s. = "mano sinistra" = left hand
Is it a suitable point for this indications? Bars 30-31, first movement, don't seem to require such signals of switching between the two hands.

Lorenzo

Offline atticus

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Re: Abbreviations in Mozart Sonata K283
Reply #2 on: December 01, 2005, 12:01:37 PM
Hi radiant,

Thanks for the explanation.  I have the Henle version and your explanation makes sense when I look at the suggested fingering.  Thanks for shedding light on my darkness!

atticus

Offline fra ungdomsdagene

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Re: Abbreviations in Mozart Sonata K283
Reply #3 on: December 04, 2005, 11:29:05 AM
Yes on bars 30 the right hand plays in the bass cleff and in bar 31 you switch again to the left hand in the bass cleff. The reason for this fingering is purely a matter of tone production, if you use the left hand to play AGF#E "forte" it's very hard if not impossible to end the scale in a "piano" D with the fifth finger. Instead you play the forte part of the scale with the right hand and end the scale with a piano D using the left hand.
Experiment with different fingerings but you will see it's very hard to produce this contrast using just the left hand.
 
Fra
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