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Topic: Finding a good piano trio  (Read 2217 times)

Offline shoenberg3

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Finding a good piano trio
on: September 25, 2003, 06:54:07 AM
I'm planning to have a piano trio performance with a violinist and a cellist.
I'm 14 and the others are around the same age.
Tell me if there is a suitable trio that we can play.
It shouldn't be too difficult or too easy.
Preferably one that is enjoyable to listeners and not too unusual.
generally working on:
Bach Toccata in g minor
Rachmaninoff 3rd Concerto

Offline la_carrenio2003

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Re: Finding a good piano trio
Reply #1 on: September 25, 2003, 07:53:28 AM
You have to tell us which repertoire you all are playing at the moment separately for giving us an idea of your level,so we could advice something...
"Soli Deo Gloria".
     J.S. Bach

Offline eddie92099

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Re: Finding a good piano trio
Reply #2 on: September 25, 2003, 04:30:15 PM
I recently played the Malcolm Arnold piano trio and would recommend the music (although the writing is not particularly idiomatic  - well it was written by a drunk trumpeter),
Ed

Offline Hmoll

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is often idiomaticRe: Finding a good piano trio
Reply #3 on: September 25, 2003, 05:27:03 PM
What la_carrenio2003 said is true - btw, welcome back la_carrenio2003 - we cannot advise without knowing what else you have played.
The trio literature generally has difficult piano parts, and the piano parts are  often idiomatically different to the solo literature.
Try listening to the Brahms, Mendelssohn, Beethoven, Ravel, Dvorak, and some other trios.
"I am sitting in the smallest room of my house. I have your review before me. In a moment it will be behind me!" -- Max Reger

Offline shoenberg3

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Re: Finding a good piano trio
Reply #4 on: September 26, 2003, 06:37:54 AM
Well, I don't want to sound proud but I had won few first prizes in competitions, and the cellist and violinist did, too.
Some of the hardest pieces I played(and "overcame")
are Prokofiev Sonatas, La Campanella, Liszt Totentaz, Grieg Concerto, Rachmaninoff Etudes and Preludes,  and Chopin Scherzi and Ballades.
generally working on:
Bach Toccata in g minor
Rachmaninoff 3rd Concerto

Offline la_carrenio2003

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Re: Finding a good piano trio
Reply #5 on: September 26, 2003, 06:54:01 AM
So, then the Rachmaninoff's Trio Elegiaque will be a piece of cake for you, and beautiful music. The Shostakovich's trio is quite cool if you like 20th century music. And of course, Brahms's trios. I love them all...
"Soli Deo Gloria".
     J.S. Bach

Offline shoenberg3

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Re: Finding a good piano trio
Reply #6 on: September 26, 2003, 07:05:34 AM
Thank you very much for the replies.
About the Brahms. I personally love that trio. However, when I asked my teacher if that one would be suitable, he said all Brahms' pieces require maturity, and implied that it is too "mature" for any 14 year olds.
generally working on:
Bach Toccata in g minor
Rachmaninoff 3rd Concerto

Offline Hmoll

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Re: Finding a good piano trio
Reply #7 on: September 26, 2003, 04:57:05 PM
Quote
Thank you very much for the replies.
About the Brahms. I personally love that trio. However, when I asked my teacher if that one would be suitable, he said all Brahms' pieces require maturity, and implied that it is too "mature" for any 14 year olds.



Not that old "maturity" bit again! I never agree with that because the more music you can learn and/or memorize before you're 20 the better - providing that your technique can handle those pieces.

However, you should take a look at the Mendelssohn trio - the D minor is somewhat overplayed, but it is an absolute joy to perform, and the Cminor (if I remember the right key) is also a great piece. Also, take a look at the Beethoven trios - Op. 1#3 is a lot of fun.

In piano trios - as in all chamber music - it is very important to rehearse a lot, not just practice on your own. I don't know how many times I've heard three very talented people doing their own thing on the stage with little regard to ensemble.

"I am sitting in the smallest room of my house. I have your review before me. In a moment it will be behind me!" -- Max Reger

Offline thracozaag

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Re: Finding a good piano trio
Reply #8 on: September 26, 2003, 05:43:26 PM
Quote
Thank you very much for the replies.
About the Brahms. I personally love that trio. However, when I asked my teacher if that one would be suitable, he said all Brahms' pieces require maturity, and implied that it is too "mature" for any 14 year olds.



Man, am I sick of that old line.  I learned the Schubert B-flat sonata when I was 11, just because it was my favorite piece of music at the time (and in some ways, still is).  Thank god my teacher was flexible enough to allow me the pleasure of learning it, even though I never performed it.  
"We have to reach a certain level before we realize how small we are."--Georges Cziffra

Offline la_carrenio2003

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Re: Finding a good piano trio
Reply #9 on: September 26, 2003, 08:52:40 PM
I agree with all of you, guys, about that maturity thing. Of course, the performance will not have all the deepness it requires, but it would be a first approach to that music. Even "mature" musicians require time for get deep into any music. And, as Hmoll says, the sooner the better. Then, 10 years from now, when you will play in some very important place or when you'll record a CD the music is technically solved and you can make music. Nobody wants to listen to a "musical" performance which is not well played...
"Soli Deo Gloria".
     J.S. Bach
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