Piano Forum

Topic: Performing for Schools  (Read 2169 times)

Offline Mayla

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 6638
Performing for Schools
on: February 21, 2006, 09:01:15 PM
.
"The greatest thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving"  ~Oliver Wendell Holmes

Offline arensky

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2324
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #1 on: February 21, 2006, 10:30:42 PM
You might want to omit the repeats in the "Twinkles", but I would be more worried about them during the second Chopin Prelude...maybe play the 7th one (A major) instead?
=  o        o  =
   \     '      /   

"One never knows about another one, do one?" Fats Waller

Offline Bob

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 16312
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #2 on: February 21, 2006, 11:02:20 PM
I would keep the whole thing short.  30 minutes at most.  Maybe pick of few of the most exciting variations.

Watch out for their pianos.  Probably won't be a grand.  Probably only good enough to play chords really, if chords.  Repetition is slow.  Uneven action.  Maybe be out of tune. 

Throw in Disney or Spongebob and they will love it.
Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."

Offline Ruro

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 252
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #3 on: February 22, 2006, 01:01:39 AM
Throw in Disney or Spongebob and they will love it.
CHRIST, of all the forums in the world and I go to the one's with Spongebob mentioned!? BLASPHOMY.

Concurred though, they might need something they recognize. I heard Vivaldi's music most days walking into the Assembly, and frankly classical music failed to appeal to me being the same old gentle strings all the time... normal teachers don't understand Classical FIRE :/ Then again I doubt they enjoyed it either (I know my Head Teacher did!)

If you like I'll try and transcribe the Pokemon theme for you :P The possibilities!

Pika Pika! *Jukebox*
*Jigs* You've been such a good friend! I known you since I don't know when!
*Continues Jigging* Pokemon!

Offline BoliverAllmon

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4155
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #4 on: February 22, 2006, 01:04:42 AM
the Baytown Symphony actually went to a local elementary and played an orchestral versino of Spongebob. OUCH it sucked.

Offline debussy symbolism

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1853
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #5 on: February 22, 2006, 01:07:46 AM
Greetings.

I think it's great that you chose these pieces. Make sure to tell them about the variations(How they are pieces made upon a theme). I am playing them myself(still needs perfecting). I haven't yet played the preludes yet, but that's gotta be good. Any reason you chose this repertoire? :)

Offline Mayla

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 6638
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #6 on: February 22, 2006, 01:24:17 AM
.
"The greatest thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving"  ~Oliver Wendell Holmes

Offline contrapunctus

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 408
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #7 on: February 22, 2006, 03:14:29 AM
I like your idea in trying to spread classical music to the schools, but I am afraid it will never catch on. If the schools you are playing are anything like my school, you can garauntee that, at most, two people know who Chopin is. They will like the theme in the Mozart, but you will lose their attention after that. I would not be suprised if they started talking about other things about two or three minutes through the performance.
It is unfortunate really.
Medtner, man.

Offline Mayla

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 6638
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #8 on: February 22, 2006, 03:40:52 AM
.
"The greatest thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving"  ~Oliver Wendell Holmes

Offline debussy symbolism

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1853
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #9 on: February 22, 2006, 04:40:33 AM
Perhaps you might want to include a piece that they are familiar with, to get their attention. Contrapunctus is right the students at that school aren't going to sit through the variations, especially if they are repeated. My suggestion is instead of repeating them, play them once and fill in the time with a "catchy" and easy pieces that they can understand. I at school often times sit at the piano to not waste time, playing Mozart's alla turca... Guess what... Practically nobody even notices, they are so inured into their pleasures, whatever feeble their comforts may be. However when someone else plays a melody familiar to them they instantaneously react. I am not sure about Fur Elise, you could try that. These are just my suggestions. Hope this helps. :)

Offline debussy symbolism

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1853
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #10 on: February 22, 2006, 04:42:27 AM
I would also like to say that I don't think that starting with a slow piece is going to get their attention either.

Offline jamie_liszt

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 353
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #11 on: February 22, 2006, 05:14:14 AM
Can I bring up Lang Langs School performance, he also did the same thing. He Captured there attention first off with something well known and also Hard. Horowitz transcription of Stars and Stripes. Then I think he played other classical stuff after that. Been a while since i see the link to it. anyone seen it before ? It was a huge primary school!

Offline Bob

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 16312
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #12 on: February 23, 2006, 01:15:43 AM
How about a Gershwin piece?  I've Got Rhythm?

What age are these kids you are performing for?
What's the setting?  Gym, music room, their regular classroom?

Did anyone do variations on chop sticks?  A decent arrangement?


The Star and Stripes is on this site somewhere.  I ask before.  Someone did respond.  It's here somewhere.


You can win the crowd... Pink Pather, theme from Titantic... oh yeah...


In all seriousness, are there any decent version of that stuff?  The very popular things -- Disney, Spongebob, etc.  Has anyone made a real piano arrangement of them?  Something that actually sounds good?  Something like that could be useful for winning over and interesting your audience in case like this.
Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."

Offline contrapunctus

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 408
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #13 on: February 23, 2006, 03:12:09 AM
Fur Elise sounds really good for this type of performance. And before you play it, you can teach them who Beethoven was !

I am serious, most people will only know his name and nothing else.
Medtner, man.

Offline AvoidedCadence

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 67
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #14 on: February 23, 2006, 03:13:43 AM
You must not sell out. :)

If you have the time and energy, you could learn a Radiohead transcription.  Better yet, learn a Liszt transcription.  :) Seriously though - virtuosity in any form is guaranteed to get attention from kids that age (and anybody else).  Also stuff that's rhythmic - like a lot of Prokofiev, Mendelssohn, Bartok, Scarlatti, ...

When I was primary-school age, I didn't care about Chopin - I liked Bach (short pieces and inventions) - the shorter works are really accessible, especially if people understand what they are listening to (imitation, etc.)  Seriously.

Really, I don't know, though ... the very idea of what the response might be makes me doubt the goodness of the universe.
Always play as though a master listened.
 - Robert Schumann

Offline Bob

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 16312
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #15 on: February 23, 2006, 03:27:53 AM
The whole Moonlight sonata might be interesting.
Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."

Offline debussy symbolism

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1853
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #16 on: February 23, 2006, 06:19:37 AM
Some of Prokofiev or Bartok might be good. I myself am to start Prokofiev's March from the 12 Easy pieces for the piano. It is driving, exciting, dissonant, Prokofievan, and awesome. You could try that. Bartok, perhaps. Bartok's piano writing is very complicated rhythmically and harmonically, as well as melodically so I don't think that they will understand that. You could try his "Chords together and in opposition" from Microkosmos, it is driving, exciting, rhythmically complex(I think), and Bartok like. You could also try his Bear dance, but I don't know. They are all awesome and not too dissonant for them to appreciate. Hope this helps.

Offline debussy symbolism

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1853
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #17 on: February 23, 2006, 06:22:27 AM
You could also "test out" some pieces infront of a young audience to see what they like. ;)

Offline Mayla

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 6638
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #18 on: February 23, 2006, 06:31:41 AM
.
"The greatest thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving"  ~Oliver Wendell Holmes

Offline debussy symbolism

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1853
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #19 on: February 23, 2006, 07:12:36 AM
What exactly do you mean by this ?  Do you mean play parts or beginnings of them and ask them if they like it and want me to continue ?

Pick a shorter piece, not the variations at first to start them off, let's say Fur Elise. They will most likely enjoy the piece(everyone, whether children or adults) through out. Then play some short pieces like the Chopin Preludes and see how they react to that. Which ones are you playing? I would go with the "Raindrop" prelude because it is "simple" beautifull, and beautifull again. If they don't like the preludes, try something more energetic and fast. I think the Prokofiev March would do the thing. Also children react to melodies they already know. That is why the go nuts for lets say..."The rugrats" theme, etc. Which is why Fur Elise is "popular" amongst them, because they know the theme(ya-da, ti-da, ti-da di du dummm, du-du-du-dummm, etc. Which is why I would save the preludes for later of the "concert" because they are unfamiliar and yes complex to them. So yes play the entire piece to the "test audience" and see how they react. I would suggest, fast and "popular"(Fur Elise) first, esoteric and complex(to them) later. Hope this helps.

Mayla

Offline Mayla

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 6638
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #20 on: February 23, 2006, 07:21:46 AM
.
"The greatest thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving"  ~Oliver Wendell Holmes

Offline Mayla

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 6638
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #21 on: February 23, 2006, 07:24:56 AM
.
"The greatest thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving"  ~Oliver Wendell Holmes

Offline debussy symbolism

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1853
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #22 on: February 23, 2006, 07:26:50 AM
Oh yes video game music. They go absolutely crazy over something from a computer game(quite beautifull actually). You could do that.

Offline debussy symbolism

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1853
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #23 on: February 23, 2006, 07:28:49 AM
And the middle section(minor). You could suggest menacing cloud. And once the major mode begins the weather has cleared. Just a suggestion.

Offline Mayla

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 6638
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #24 on: February 23, 2006, 07:30:57 AM
.
"The greatest thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving"  ~Oliver Wendell Holmes

Offline debussy symbolism

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1853
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #25 on: February 23, 2006, 04:59:04 PM
I hope you a good concert. :)

Offline Bob

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 16312
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #26 on: February 25, 2006, 09:21:16 PM
Knock it o....

(reads carefully and shuts up)
Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."

Offline clef

  • PS Silver Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 118
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #27 on: February 25, 2006, 10:19:17 PM
I am going to be starting my public schools tour ( ;D) in a couple of months and I am wondering something....

So far my program is as follows :

Mozart  :
Zwolf Variationen uber .. Ah, vous dirai-je, Maman

Chopin :
Preludes 1-3

Beethoven :
Fur Elise


Question :


1.  Do you think the kids could sit through the entire Twinkle and Variations ?


Thanks,
Mayla




make them....   

Offline Bob

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 16312
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #28 on: February 26, 2006, 12:31:44 AM
Shorter is better than longer.  If they like it, they'll want more.  If they hate it, then it wasn't so long for them.


The way you'll really know what works is to do some performances.

Kids change daily.  They may love it one day and hate it the next.  You can't go by what they say either.
Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."

Offline Mayla

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 6638
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #29 on: February 26, 2006, 12:33:51 AM
.
"The greatest thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving"  ~Oliver Wendell Holmes

Offline Bob

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 16312
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #30 on: February 26, 2006, 12:48:47 AM
Sure.  The teachers will like it too.  Win the teachers over.  The teacher influence the kids.

Don't forget to leave business cards for the kids that want lessons.

Good luck! :)
Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."

Offline jamie_liszt

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 353
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #31 on: February 26, 2006, 01:35:13 AM
1st mvt of moonlight sonata is too boring for school childeren, maybe the third movement.

Offline Mayla

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 6638
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #32 on: February 26, 2006, 01:37:00 AM
.
"The greatest thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving"  ~Oliver Wendell Holmes

Offline Bob

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 16312
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #33 on: February 26, 2006, 02:09:33 AM
What age are these kids?

I wouldn't put the slow piece first, but I think they would recognize it.
Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."

Offline Mayla

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 6638
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #34 on: February 26, 2006, 02:16:41 AM
.
"The greatest thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving"  ~Oliver Wendell Holmes

Offline lufia

  • PS Silver Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 115
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #35 on: February 26, 2006, 02:58:43 AM
im not so sure the raindrop prelude is a good idea, people at my school love the nocture in e flat and the raindrop sounds a bit dull to them
musicality

Offline Bob

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 16312
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #36 on: February 26, 2006, 03:01:14 AM
You might want to have something else ready just in case.  An encorce piece.
Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."

Offline lufia

  • PS Silver Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 115
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #37 on: February 26, 2006, 03:03:59 AM
i really wouldn't recommend the prelude...!! its taboo
musicality

Offline mike_lang

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1496
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #38 on: February 26, 2006, 03:16:33 AM
.

Offline jamie_liszt

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 353
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #39 on: February 26, 2006, 11:57:21 AM
Mozart Rondo alla turca, Beethoven Fur else, Chopin heroic polonaise, Fantasie impromtu. are all examples of popular classical pieces. maybe even symphony no 5 by beethoven. moonlight 3rd or pathetique 3rd. maybe even the 1st mvt of pathetique.

Its just my opinion that little kids will hate slow music. unless they have heard it a billion times that they wont care. idk.

Offline mike_lang

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1496
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #40 on: February 26, 2006, 01:10:18 PM
.

Offline Mayla

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 6638
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #41 on: February 26, 2006, 03:36:59 PM
.
"The greatest thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving"  ~Oliver Wendell Holmes

Offline Bob

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 16312
Re: Performing for Schools
Reply #42 on: February 27, 2006, 02:56:48 AM
You may want to tell the music teacher or whoever is setting this up with you and have them put you on the school calendar or just have them remind the other teachers.  There are lots of things that go on at schools and sometimes things end up conflicting at the last minute.

Call and confirma couple days in advance.

You don't to show up and have them unprepared.
Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."
 

Logo light pianostreet.com - the website for classical pianists, piano teachers, students and piano music enthusiasts.

Subscribe for unlimited access

Sign up

Follow us

Piano Street Digicert