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Topic: major and minor intervals  (Read 2392 times)

Offline nvcc

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major and minor intervals
on: October 30, 2003, 08:08:05 PM
Alright.....I'm trying to find a shortcut to figuring out what makes a major interval and what makes a minor interval. In major intervals are there always an even number of semitones? In minor intervals are there an odd amount of semitones? for example....I know C to E makes a major 3rd.That is 4 semitones. C to E flat is 3 semitones. Am I on the right track? Thank you very much in advance!

Offline eddie92099

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Re: major and minor intervals
Reply #1 on: October 31, 2003, 12:42:24 AM
You're quite right for describing thirds that way,
Ed

Offline allchopin

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Re: major and minor intervals
Reply #2 on: October 31, 2003, 01:32:00 AM
not necessarily, because the perfect fourth to fifth screws that up past a 5th interval- a major sixth has 9 semitones in this sense.
You should try to hear the difference between minor and major with relative pitch ability (important skill to work up).
A modern house without a flush toilet... uncanny.

Offline nvcc

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Re: major and minor intervals
Reply #3 on: October 31, 2003, 03:10:20 AM
Hi there. I just found a table of intervals. I can HEAR the difference between a major and minor interval but when it comes to looking at it on paper and deciding whether or not it is major or minor is a completely different story. My RCM exam for Grade 1 theory will require me to look at say a minor 6th on paper and I will have to figure it out that it is a minor interval.

Offline PianoProfBonsWay

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Re: major and minor intervals
Reply #4 on: October 31, 2003, 12:04:19 PM
Intervals of Major and Minors are based from your major  scale-wise laws.
Example: Key of C (Natural tone scale-wise)
C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C individually are classified as major.
Minor a Major D and it becomes minor Db.
Minor = 1/2 step down.
1st     C+C = major    lower  it 1/2 = minor
2nd    C+D = major        "          "
3rd     C+E = major        "          "
4th     C+F = major        "          "
5th     C+G = major   C+G b = Diminished
6th      C+A = major    lower it 1/2 = minor
7th      C+B = major          "         "
8th       C+C' = major        "         "

Now when you look at 3rd only, like from a root position of a triad (c+e+g), Bottom third is major = 2 whole steps. Top third is minor = 1 1/2 steps. These  laws are based off the root position of a triad.

major 4th is  2 1/2.
major 5th is 3 1/2. (But, the 3rd could be a lowered 1/2 = minor type)
Augmented 5th is 4 whole steps (raised 1/2 step)

I learned from an old master from Europe and this is the way he explained it to me years ago.  I like the European system of thinking.

B.W.J.
Prof. B.J. Woodruff
Bon's Way Fastrak Piano Educational System

Offline nvcc

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Re: major and minor intervals
Reply #5 on: October 31, 2003, 07:10:04 PM
So a root position triad....the bottom 3rd is always major and the top is always minor? Very interesting way of learning the majors and minors. Im also learning augmented and diminished and inverting intervals.

Offline PianoProfBonsWay

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Re: major and minor intervals
Reply #6 on: November 01, 2003, 09:38:09 AM
So a root position triad....the bottom 3rd is always major and the top is always minor? YES! Very interesting way of learning the majors and minors. Im also learning augmented and diminished and inverting intervals. READ  THE BELOW INFORMATION, AGAIN FROM THE GREAT MASTER IN EUROPE.
________________________________________________
Major = 2 whole steps in 3rds, and 3 1 1/2 steps in a root triad.

LAW of the 3rd's & LAW if Root Position of Triads.
2 whole steps of a 3rd = major
1 1/2 step of a 3rd = minor

2 + 1 1/2 = 3 1/2 steps  = large major (sample: C+E+G)
2 + 2 = 4 = Augmented 5th = larger (sample: C+E+G#). If you are in sample traid B+D#+F# then the 'F#' would become a double sharp in the Augmented 5th.

1 1/2 + 2 = 3 1/2 steps = small minor (sample: C+Eb+G)
1 1/2 + 1 1/2 steps = Diminished = smaller              (sample: C+Eb+Gb)  C Dim = 5th tone (perfect fifth) is one 'flat' NOT called minor it, but Diminished. Also, like C7, in which you have minored the 7th, to diminish the 7th = 'bb' flat (sample C+Eb+Gb+Bbb).

Inverting intervals:  Think this thought and you will  always know what you are doing (by turning it upside down you invert it)....

5th & 4th:  sample... C+G+C ( C up to G = perfect 5th (right side up) and G up to C =  perfect 4th. The only perfect sound in music, using the Tonic and Dominant Roots.


Try this:  R.H.  E-G-C-E-D-F (AROUND THE GROUP OF TWO BLACK KEYS)  F+B = E+C' (RIGHT SIDE UP, WITH melody on the top note, B and E being the harmony. Play the same gingle around the group of two black keys and end it with B+F' = C'+E' ( Inverted 'upside down, with melody on the bottom keys.
Prof. B.J. Woodruff
Bon's Way Fastrak Piano Educational System
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