Piano Forum logo
November 17, 2017, 07:32:03 PM *
   Forum Home   Help Search  


Wigmore Hall As Schiff's Magic Laboratory

Sir Andras Schiff's eloquence as a teacher and profound insights as a thinker about music make his Masterclass sessions irresistible to participants and audiences alike. Through the course of this event an outstanding young musician, chosen by Sir András himself, will explore some of the repertoire featured in the previous evening's concert. Read more >>

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: How do I prepare for playing Mozart in the Italian Style  (Read 12503 times)
barnowl
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 447


« on: August 23, 2006, 08:26:41 PM »

In the first run of 16th notes in the first movement of K.545, , there's a footnote in .
W.A. MOZART—An Introduction to His Keyboard Works that reads:

To play sixteenth notes legato, as marked by many editors, is contradictory to the Italian style for Allegro movements. To cite only one of many sources, Giuseppe Tartini wrote of sixteenth-note passages in Allegro tempos: "Play the notes detached and separate, with a little space between each two—as if there were a rest after every note." (My bolding.)

So, should I play my scales as the footnote says I should play Mozart in order to prepare? I think I could still handle the legato of the other stuff I'm working on—a Chopin Prelude and a Beethoven Sonatina.

Any tips on playing Italian style will be welcomed.

For what it's worth, this book I referred to seems to be a wonderful introduction to Mozart. This 2006 edition even includes an audio CD with which you can hear all the pieces in the book, all of them easy (if you call his Somata in C Major easy).

The editor, Willard A. Palmer is a stickler for publishing (and playing) Mozart the way Wolfie would want his works done. I love that kind of respect.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

piano sheet music of Sonata
pianistimo
PS Gold Member
Sr. Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12143


« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2006, 08:46:47 PM »

mozart was less into italian or german schools of thought than he was 'violin' technique, imo.  he was probably wanting it to sound full of clarity.  now if you make the passages pure staccato - it wouldn't sound 'violinish.'  remember, mozart also played the violin quite well (if i remember right) and understood it's implications for melodious playing.  a 'light marcato' might be a better description than pure staccato.  little or no pedalling, and very clear sounds with light fast fingers. 
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
pianistimo
PS Gold Member
Sr. Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12143


« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2006, 08:52:57 PM »

i wish i knew more about violin playing.  i would be interested to hear the passage with a violin and would take my tips from how it sounded from a good violinist's point.  can you find one to play that passage? 
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
barnowl
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 447


« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2006, 09:19:47 PM »

i wish i knew more about violin playing.  i would be interested to hear the passage with a violin and would take my tips from how it sounded from a good violinist's point.  can you find one to play that passage? 

No, I don't know any violinists. But, I have CDs of Mozart's Piano Concertos from

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=br_ss_hs/104-9959102-1011934?platform=gurupa&url=index%3Dclassical&keywords=Mozart+The+great+concertos&Go.x=0&Go.y=0&Go=Go

played by Alfred Brendel and he plays Italian style. You can hear the spaces between the notes. It is breathtaking. I want to know how to do this.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
teresa_b
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 603


« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2006, 12:28:12 PM »

I would say less arm weight that you would use in the more Romantic composers.  Very little to no pedal in these passages, keep your hand very evenly positioned as you play the runs and work for as close to perfect ( Smiley) evenness of tone--no clunkiness at all! 

You still have to do your dynamics so it isn't boring.  I have found that if I lean a bit in the direction I'm going, I can make a crescendo while still keeping the lightness of touch. 

Imagine how a fortepiano would sound.  Think crystal clarity.  I always find that images like this help me. 

Good luck and have fun with this gorgeous music!
Teresa
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
barnowl
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 447


« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2006, 01:28:31 PM »

I would say less arm weight that you would use in the more Romantic composers.  Very little to no pedal in these passages, keep your hand very evenly positioned as you play the runs and work for as close to perfect ( Smiley) evenness of tone--no clunkiness at all! 

You still have to do your dynamics so it isn't boring.  I have found that if I lean a bit in the direction I'm going, I can make a crescendo while still keeping the lightness of touch. 

Imagine how a fortepiano would sound.  Think crystal clarity.  I always find that images like this help me. 

Good luck and have fun with this gorgeous music!
Teresa

Thanks, Teresa_B! I will keep your excellent thoughts in mind.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
benard
PS Silver Member
Newbie
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2012, 04:11:43 PM »

What key do I play Mozart's sonata K309 in?
 
  thanks
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
lostprin36
PS Silver Member
Newbie
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 16


« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2012, 05:27:30 PM »

Thanks.........
I have got something from your post. Its really useful.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Are you looking for Music or Musician!
j_menz
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 10150


« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2012, 11:22:30 PM »

Eat plenty of pasta.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

"What the world needs is more geniuses with humility. There are so few of us left" -- Oscar Levant
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  


Need more info or help?


Search pianostreet.com - the web's largest resource of information about piano playing:



 
Jump to:  


Most popular classical piano composers:
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

o