\"\"
Piano Forum logo

Chopin Nocturne in B - op 32 n1 (Read 8480 times)

Offline piano121

  • PS Silver Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 213
Chopin Nocturne in B - op 32 n1
« on: September 09, 2006, 06:04:39 PM »
Hello everybody. Here is my atempt with Chopin. Coments are most well come!

piano sheet music of Nocturne


Offline teresa_b

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 603
Re: Chopin Nocturne in B - op 32 n1
«Reply #1 on: September 09, 2006, 06:58:30 PM »
Very nice, piano121.  You have a lovely feel for Chopin--Keep up the nice work!  ;D

Teresa

P.S. Many thanks for telling me how to split a track into 3.  I posted Mozart after splitting it into its movements. 

Offline piano121

  • PS Silver Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 213
Re: Chopin Nocturne in B - op 32 n1
«Reply #2 on: September 10, 2006, 01:01:18 PM »
 :) thanks. I was trying to have some freedow with rubatos and all, but not so much. Trying to keep it solid somehow, without to much exageration. Find a balance on chopin... giving it that romantic feeling with more cantabile and more pedaling, and at the same time being clear and keep things controled.  Glad you like it ;)

Offline philippa

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 39
Re: Chopin Nocturne in B - op 32 n1
«Reply #3 on: May 09, 2007, 02:49:20 PM »
I can see what you mean with your criticizm of mine now- your trills are amazingly clear. My first thought was "it's a bit slow", though- relative to my attempt anyway!

I thought this was awesome. I'm no expert, but your phrasing is fab, really thoughtful.

Strange about the different endings- I think I prefer the minor ending, because I'm used to it.

I love this piece.

Offline rachfan

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3027
Re: Chopin Nocturne in B - op 32 n1
«Reply #4 on: May 09, 2007, 06:53:25 PM »
The B major ending originated with the first German edition of F. Kistner.  The opinion of the editorial board that later oversaw the Paderewski Edition was that the sharp on the D, creating the major dyad there, was likely added in error instead of a natural.  The reasoning is that F. Kistner similarly used the D# in measure 63 just before the codetta.  The original French edition, M. Schlesinger, shows a D natural, which was believed to be correct.  When it comes to Chopin, there are many differences among editions like this one.  Some differences were due to Chopin making changes on his students' scores, which eventually  were printed as revisions (like Mikuli or Klindworth) in later editions.  Unfortunately, Chopin sometimes was too impatient to carefully read his proof copies of scores for accuracy before signing off on them.  These differences keep it interesting for the pianist and listener alike. 
Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities.

Offline piano121

  • PS Silver Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 213
Re: Chopin Nocturne in B - op 32 n1
«Reply #5 on: May 09, 2007, 08:25:31 PM »
My first thought was "it's a bit slow", though- relative to my attempt anyway!

Yes, I agree with that. But at the time I recorded it I was kind of hapy with the tempo. Later on I got it a tiny bit faster, wich I found was very adequate for the theme of this nocturne. I might re-record it some day. Thanks for your insight! :)

Offline piano121

  • PS Silver Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 213
Re: Chopin Nocturne in B - op 32 n1
«Reply #6 on: May 09, 2007, 08:30:11 PM »
Rachfan, thanks for your informative reply. It´s quite similar to what my teacher have told me at the time I was practicing this piece. You are very knowlegeable on romantic music.  :)

Offline rachfan

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3027
Re: Chopin Nocturne in B - op 32 n1
«Reply #7 on: May 10, 2007, 06:02:12 PM »
Hi piano121,

Sometimes the pianist can use discretion on these score discrepancies, unless an urtext edition in its scholarly commentary presents completely compelling evidence of an error in the manuscript or autograph copy.  I'm reminded of the famous E natural in measure 3 of Chopin's funerial Prelude No. 21 in Cm.  In the original score, Chopin clearly left that E as a natural...  but then wrote in a flat on a student's score.  The majority of opinion is that it should probably be an E flat, but the issue has never been fully resolved.  I always play the E natural.  That's the way I learned it, and although I could easily make the change, somehow the E natural is still stuck in my ear, and sounds "better" and more consistent, especially where the preceding measure ends in A flat major, not minor.   :)   
Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities.

Offline faj

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 98
Re: Chopin Nocturne in B - op 32 n1
«Reply #8 on: May 14, 2007, 12:46:34 AM »
You have a beautiful heart. You're able to make someone cry !
Have you tried to lift pedal or key gradually ( not as on/off) when entering silence in some place (for example at 0:27) ?. This is not a critism, just courious.

Offline piano121

  • PS Silver Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 213
Re: Chopin Nocturne in B - op 32 n1
«Reply #9 on: May 15, 2007, 12:37:52 AM »
Thanks a lot for your kind compliment.  :D

About note lifting....It´s Interesting. In this piece, and similars I usualy try release the pedal, just a little later than the key it self. So when I reach silence, it gets a softer transition, rather than abrupt silence. I guess you can notice that, on 0:27. Did you? When I´m playing without the pedal,  and I have a note wich its folowed by a pause, or simply non legato, I always try to release it in a soft way, so it won´t look like a hic up or something. I never thought it in terms of lifting if gradualy, just softly. I that what you mean?

Offline zheer

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2780
Re: Chopin Nocturne in B - op 32 n1
«Reply #10 on: May 15, 2007, 04:39:36 PM »
   Chopin was not an aristocrat, However his Nocturne for piano were a delight for the aristocracy, i feel that your interpreation of this nocturne captured that side of the  world that Chopin must have lived in.  ;)
" Nothing ends nicely, that's why it ends" - Tom Cruise -

Offline faj

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 98
Re: Chopin Nocturne in B - op 32 n1
«Reply #11 on: May 28, 2007, 04:38:09 AM »
Thanks a lot for your kind compliment.  :D

About note lifting....It´s Interesting. In this piece, and similars I usualy try release the pedal, just a little later than the key it self. So when I reach silence, it gets a softer transition, rather than abrupt silence. I guess you can notice that, on 0:27. Did you? When I´m playing without the pedal,  and I have a note wich its folowed by a pause, or simply non legato, I always try to release it in a soft way, so it won´t look like a hic up or something. I never thought it in terms of lifting if gradualy, just softly. I that what you mean?

Yes, that what I mean ..  :)
Sorry for very late reply

Offline dora96

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 255
Re: Chopin Nocturne in B - op 32 n1
«Reply #12 on: November 16, 2007, 03:38:38 AM »
G'day

It is beautiful ! You inspired me to learn this Nocturne. You recorded the song so clear. How did you do that? What system did you use. I have nocturne I like to record, but the background noise - it is problem. Please let me know thanks

Very well done

Offline piano121

  • PS Silver Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 213
Re: Chopin Nocturne in B - op 32 n1
«Reply #13 on: December 01, 2007, 05:26:59 PM »
Hi! Nice to hear tat you liked the recording itself. Actualy It was a torment to get an acceptable sound from my piano. Ít just sounds to pianoforte like, imo. That´s one of the reasons I am not doing much recordings lately... The piano simply doesnt´t give me tha kind of respounse I would like. I hope to get money to aford a better piano any time soon! That´s a necessity.

But going to you question  ;D . My set up was very cheap! I used 1 semi pro Shure microphone with a stand. conected directly to my 64bit Audigy soundblaster sound card. I tried several positions, and got all kinds of messy results. Afterwards I find out the best position would be exaclty on the center of the piano (upright) with the open lid, with the microphone head located inside the instrument.

The second stage would be in the computer. The sound gets realy methalic and not beautifull at all. So I do a few adjustments in Sound Forge, to get it warmer. As logs as its very diferent than the soud of a CD, and there is only one channel of sound, I try to make it similar to the sound of an old LP.  ;D  The setings I use are probably seting the softeness 2 or 3 dots more soft. depending on the piece I revcord. And finaly ading a little bit of reverbaration, to make it more natural.

Of course this seting seems good to my piano with the equip I listed. Later on I figured oput that 2 condensed mics, with a pre amp, would do a much better job after all. And there might be many better options as well.

Anyway thanks for listening, I´m glad you enjoyed. Maibe I will get new stuff recorded when I get a better piano. 

See ya