Piano Forum



The World of Piano Competitions Ė issue 2 2022
The World of Piano Competitions is a magazine initiated by PIANIST Magazine (Netherlands and Germany) and its Editor-in-Chief Eric Schoones. Here we get a rich insight into the world of international piano competitions through the eyes of its producers and participants. Read more >>

Topic: Sonatas (Boredom)  (Read 5221 times)

Offline chopiabin

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 925
Sonatas (Boredom)
on: January 14, 2004, 06:43:33 AM
I always start a sonata that I love, but once I have learned the first few pages, I start to get bored. It feels like the mystery it once held has disappeared, and I lose all motivation to continue working on it. Am I the only one who experiences this? Are there any ways to counteract this?

Chop

Offline dj

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 296
Re: Sonatas (Boredom)
Reply #1 on: January 14, 2004, 06:53:38 AM
yeah ur not alone, im the same way....and the only thing i can think of to counteract it is 2 have your teacher assign the piece so u have 2 finish it. good luck
rach on!

Offline krenske

  • PS Silver Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 139
Re: Sonatas (Boredom)
Reply #2 on: January 14, 2004, 07:22:50 AM
YES!!!  ;D
I have the answer.

Don't learn sonatas... except perhaps Mozart ones.

Another rule I have adopted is...
don't learn etudes unless you can help it [ some of them contain too much mystery ]

learn a beautiful nocturne, or some rachmaninov, or the mozart bmoll adagio, or some nice tchaikovsky, or compose a little something yourself..
"Horowitz died so Krenske could live."

Offline chopiabin

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 925
Re: Sonatas (Boredom)
Reply #3 on: January 14, 2004, 07:28:22 AM
I somewhat agree with you on etudes - they can get repetitive - but sometimes they are a really fun challenge. Generally I like to go with pieces whose focus is not technical difficulty (although they may have an incredible amount) but musicality.

Offline steveolongfingers

  • PS Silver Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 119
Re: Sonatas (Boredom)
Reply #4 on: January 17, 2004, 07:11:54 AM
Easy, learn the whole thing before you get bored of it, unless its uber hard...... ;)
Writing about music is like dancing about architecture Ė itís a stupid thing to want to do- Frank Zappa

Offline bernhard

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 5078
Re: Sonatas (Boredom)
Reply #5 on: January 17, 2004, 12:06:28 PM
I can give you a solution to the boredom problem.

But you will not appreciate it if you do not explore the problem.

So ask yourself this:

1. What exactly is boredom?
2. How do you know when you are bored?
3. Were there times when you were not bored at all, and somehow boredom crept on you? If so, how did it happen?
4. Conversely were there times when you were most bored and suddenly something sparkled your interest? If so, what made the difference?

Investigate boredom in this way for a while (use the practice of your sonata to this effect), and once you have a bit more insight into the boredon phenomenon, I will suggest a solution.

By the way, you do not need to answer these questions here in the thread (but you may if you want). But you need to consider them for yourself, otherwise you will not appreciate the solution.

I will post this solution in one week's time. (One week should be enough for your investigation). ;)

Best wishes,
Bernhard.
The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side. (Hunter Thompson)

Offline dgk88

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 54
Re: Sonatas (Boredom)
Reply #6 on: January 21, 2004, 01:59:00 PM
I'm the same way when it comes to Beethoven and Mozart sonatas, however you should try some of the more obscure sonatas such as, the Grieg Sonata in e minor Op. 7, or any of the prokofiev or Rachmaninoff Sonatas, plus they are great to have in your repertoire.

Offline eddie92099

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1816
Re: Sonatas (Boredom)
Reply #7 on: January 21, 2004, 07:15:23 PM
Quote
any of the prokofiev or Rachmaninoff Sonatas


I would not describe them as obscure, although they are certainly great pieces. A wonderful obscure sonata is Rautavaara's Second which I have played and is great fun,
Ed

Offline chopiabin

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 925
Re: Sonatas (Boredom)
Reply #8 on: January 21, 2004, 11:41:37 PM
Yeah, dude. Rautavaara is awesome!

Chitch

  • Guest
Re: Sonatas (Boredom)
Reply #9 on: January 22, 2004, 08:48:15 PM
Sonatas are a little like Bach in the sense that you've got to search through every piece you're allowed to play for your exam/audition and ask yourself "Is this piece something I want to learn?", so that you can really give your best performance. Even if the piece you choose is overplayed, you'll give a better performance then if you played something that you just want to get over with and "delete" from your repertoire.

Offline bernhard

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 5078
Re: Sonatas (Boredom)
Reply #10 on: February 01, 2004, 12:23:44 AM
As previously promised in this thread, here is the solution to the boredom problem in one single word: Awareness.

Where does boredom comes from?

It comes from the human mindís habit to start imagining something completely unrelated to the activity at hand. For instance, as you are practising, your mind starts wondering whatís for dinner, or starts fantasizing about some Caribbean holiday. As a result you feel boredom in relation to the actual activity you are doing

Ultimately boredom with an activity comes from a lack of awareness of the sensations involved in that activity. The moment you become aware of what you are doing, it all becomes very fascinating and absorbing.

So this is the secret: To practise with attention and awareness.

Try it!
The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side. (Hunter Thompson)

Offline marcelo

  • PS Silver Member
  • Newbie
  • ***
  • Posts: 1
Re: Sonatas (Boredom)
Reply #11 on: February 03, 2004, 04:43:37 AM
Oh yes! I agree! Sometimes it gets boring, but only if you are not excited at all with the piece you are playing. Sometimes, I try to hear many times in my radio the same music I am playing to compare myself with what the music should sound like. This gets me challanged to play better, and so it gets more fun!  ;D

Offline chopiabin

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 925
Re: Sonatas (Boredom)
Reply #12 on: February 03, 2004, 06:36:36 AM
No, I don't really think about other things, it's just that certain passages I once found amazing lose their magic. I can play long pieces as long as there isn't too much repetition, but I got really bored with the last mvmnt of the moonlight (a piece that I used to love).
For more information about this topic, click search below!
 

Logo light pianostreet.com - the website for classical pianists, piano teachers, students and piano music enthusiasts.

Subscribe for unlimited access

Sign up

Follow us

Piano Street Digicert