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moonlight sonata (Read 2013 times)

Offline maestoso

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moonlight sonata
« on: October 17, 2006, 04:21:06 PM »
i am pretty much polishing up the first movement of the moonlight and was wondering which movement would you recommend next? or let it go and learn some other pieces to develop the speed needed to play the 3rd. is the 2nd easy(learnable in a progressive way)
"Music is a higher revelation than all wisdom and philosphy. Music is the electrical soil in which the spirit lives, thinks and invents." - Ludwig van Beethoven

piano sheet music of Sonata 14 (Moonlight)


Offline marco_from_brazil

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Re: moonlight sonata
«Reply #1 on: October 17, 2006, 05:16:49 PM »
I think the 2nd has much less technical difficulties than the 3rd. with the added benefit of being pretty short. :)
Learning:
Bach Prelude and Fugue C-minor WTC Bk.2
Chopin Etude no.6 Op. 10
Beethoven 6 Variations on 'Nel cor piu non mi sento'
Villa-Lobos 'As traquinices do mascarado mignon'

Offline aaron_ginn

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Re: moonlight sonata
«Reply #2 on: October 17, 2006, 10:08:00 PM »
I'm a relative newbie (playing for a little over four months).  I've pretty much got the 1st movement down (although it will be many months before it sounds right, IYKWIM).  I decided to skip the second and jump directly into the fire of the 3rd.  I've been working on it part time for around two months and things are finally starting to come together.  If you go for the 3rd, there are a few passages to concentrate on.

The first is the ending which is a nasty series of two-handed ascending and descending arpeggios.  I've dedicated about 25% of my time on this piece solely to playing these few measures.  I'm just now getting to the point of being able to play them at a slow allegro speed without too many mistakes.

The second passage to begin working on is comprised of measures 9-14.  Use the fingerings on the free sheet music on this site and practice this section HS until you're blue in the face.  Only then should you try to play HT.  This passage is very difficult to play at full speed.  I'm getting close...

The third thing to work on are the Alberti accompaniments scattered throughout the piece (mainly in the LH).  Just play them over and over until the people you live with start complaining about the monotony of it, and then play them some more!

Finally, start working on the trills in measures 30 and 32.  These are extremely difficult to play at speed, especially if you have small hands.  I'm not even close to being able to pull them off despite the fact that I have larger than average hands.

Oh, and starting practicing C# arpeggios over and over with both hands.  Once you can play them up and down the keyboard, play them faster.  We're shooting for around 160 beats per minute in this piece.

In reality, the piece is difficult but it's not impossible.  I'm a total beginner and when I'm warmed up I can play the first eight measures at near fast allegro speed without too many mistakes.  This is after probably 60-70 hours of practice on this piece.  I've read that if you can master these few sections, you can play the whole movement.  I haven't ventured much beyond measure 65 as much of the movement repeats.  My goal was to be able to play this movement adequately within a year.  At the rate I'm progressing, I'm beginning to think it's doable.

Good luck!

Offline ksnmohan

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Re: moonlight sonata
«Reply #3 on: October 22, 2006, 04:16:01 PM »
Hallo Maestro,

If you are planning  to perform the Monlight Sonata (in Public or just for visitors at home) the unwritten rule is either play the whole piece (3 movements) or just play the First.

Skippng the 2nd and playing  the 1st and 3rd is basically "bad manners".

But if this exercise is just for your learning practice and for playing to yourself and your parents, then anything is allowed.

Regards

Prof K S (Mohan) Narayanan
Musicologist, Composer, Teacher
Chenai, India

Offline zheer

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Re: moonlight sonata
«Reply #4 on: October 22, 2006, 04:26:33 PM »

Prof K S (Mohan) Narayanan
Musicologist, Composer, Teacher
Chenai, India

 Is this a joke.
" Nothing ends nicely, that's why it ends" - Tom Cruise -

Offline ksnmohan

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Re: moonlight sonata
«Reply #5 on: October 22, 2006, 06:56:37 PM »
Hallo Zheer,

I didn't quite catch you. You have quoted just my name and occupation and made the remark "Is this a joke?".

No, I am definitely not - please make a Google search under

"music mohan narayanan".

On the other hand, if what I had conveyed in my message seems to be a joke, this is what I have been taught in Germany where I worked for a long time.  Either one or all of the Sonata's (usually 3, sometimes 4)  Movements need be played in PUBLIC performances.

Warm Regards

Prof Narayanan 

Offline zheer

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Re: moonlight sonata
«Reply #6 on: October 22, 2006, 07:41:55 PM »
Hallo Zheer,

On the other hand, if what I had conveyed in my message seems to be a joke, this is what I have been taught in Germany where I worked for a long time.  Either one or all of the Sonata's (usually 3, sometimes 4)  Movements need be played in PUBLIC performances.

Warm Regards

Prof Narayanan 

   Errr, man what are you going on about.

  The reference to one's status sounds rather funy on this forum thats all,chill out.
" Nothing ends nicely, that's why it ends" - Tom Cruise -

Offline emill

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Re: moonlight sonata
«Reply #7 on: October 22, 2006, 11:57:42 PM »
 ;D  aahh ... the cultural divide ....

As you can probably discern, Prof. Narayanan does not have the faintest idea.
It is very common not only in India, but also in many asian countries that
that persons ordinarily carry and are referred to by their academic titles
or professions.  So that after ones name comes the PHds, the MAs and
other "entitlements".  It is a practise that westerners find unusual, but
really nothing to it ... farthest is to brag.

So, as far as the Prof's question was ..... he really missed the point!

Hope this helps things ..... no need for him to chill out.
member on behalf of my son, Lorenzo

Offline ksnmohan

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Re: moonlight sonata
«Reply #8 on: October 23, 2006, 02:50:53 AM »
Hallo zheer, hallo emill,

Your mails.

I fully agree with what both of you feel about the usage of titles. Emill's observation that "we westerners find it unusual" is also correct, but only to some extent. My formative years were in Germany, where even today  people established in their areas of work are addressed by their titles, especially when they are no longer that young (I am 72). In  Europe - including England - I am spoken to  addressed by my Professor title, even though I have never asked or insisted that they should do so.

My travels take me twice or thrice a year to Europe and the US. And this is not "bragging" as emill has faintly hinted, when I state the fact that I am currently on my Passport Number 21 - just to give you an indication of the amount of international travelling I have done.

By revealing my name and credentials at the footer, I am just being open - you know with whom you are discussing. I am not hiding behind the veil of a mere ID. Here is my e-mail as well:

ksnmohan@yahoo.com 

So no ill feelings whatsoever from my side on your observations. They are well taken. This is Forum on Music and the Piano - and I hate diversions from them. My sincere apologies for starting one.

Let the music play!

Warm Regards and Best wishes


Prof K S Narayanan
Musicologist, Composer, Teacher
Chennai, India





Offline emill

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Re: moonlight sonata
«Reply #9 on: October 23, 2006, 03:24:16 AM »
Dear Prof. Narayanan, :)

Being an asian myself, I was trying to explain that "titles"
are considered regular and ordinary attachments to names in many
asian countries.  So that one is called Engineer,  Attorney or doctor so and so
even in situations which have nothing to do with their academic accomplishments.
So that when a salesperson asks to whom will the receipt be made out to ...
one may ordinarily answer ... to Attorney Juan dela Cruz, without a trace or farthest
from bragging
, which I clearly stated above.  So that as an asian I find your signature - Prof. Prof K S Narayanan  Musicologist, Composer, Teacher;  Chennai, India to be absolutely proper.

Now, the only reason why zheer probably reacted was that he had no idea of this cultural nuance among many asians.  BTW, I am from the Philippines.

As you said and I  agree 200 % - Let the music play!!!!!!!

emill

(apologies to maestoso for this slight diversion)
member on behalf of my son, Lorenzo

Offline zheer

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Re: moonlight sonata
«Reply #10 on: October 23, 2006, 10:51:47 AM »
Dear Prof. Narayanan, :)

Now, the only reason why zheer probably reacted was that he had no idea of this cultural nuance among many asians.  BTW, I am from the Philippines.




   
  My apologies



  BA in Law Zheer Bjalan
  Cert in Sociology
  8 GCES
  3 A level.

  If you wish contact me on- www.*I disagree*.co.uk
" Nothing ends nicely, that's why it ends" - Tom Cruise -

Offline ksnmohan

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Re: moonlight sonata
«Reply #11 on: October 23, 2006, 11:19:15 AM »
Hallo zheer,

Your mail. I don't think that you have done anything to apologize for. Therefore I have no apologies to accept. Its so simple!

Law and Music seem to go well together - the former Attorney General of India, Mr Soli Sorabjee was a great Jazz musician - but I do not know if he also played the piano.

I must visit your website.......its URL looks so unusual.

Warm Regards

Ksnmohan

Offline zheer

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Re: moonlight sonata
«Reply #12 on: October 23, 2006, 07:22:24 PM »

- the former Attorney General of India, Mr Soli Sorabjee was a great Jazz musician - but I do not know if he also played the piano.

  No science or maths in LAw or music, anyway sadly am a failed musician, and a danger to society, unlike the former attorney general.

  Ciao for Know.  8)
" Nothing ends nicely, that's why it ends" - Tom Cruise -

Offline ksnmohan

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Re: moonlight sonata
«Reply #13 on: October 27, 2006, 03:03:19 AM »
Hi zheer,

I tried to reach your website over a dozen times -  www.*I disagree*.co.uk.

Only get the reply that there is no such URL.

Musicians - either "failed" or "successful "- pose no danger to society. Music does not permit that. Any one who has taken up Music seriously as you have, is definitely "blessed".

So you have no reason for any self "undervaluation" - things can change anytime. We all live in that hope only.

Warm Regards
 

Offline kempff1234

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Re: moonlight sonata
«Reply #14 on: October 27, 2006, 07:23:53 AM »
Very constructive advice for playing teh third movement of moonlight... I specially enjoy the last ones 8) If only kempff and Rubinstein were alive, they could use your advices.


Anyways, I want to add another tricky bit is the part after the repeat signs where you have teh melody in your left hand and the alberti in ur right. YOU HAVE TO GET THAT CLEAR ENOUGH.