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Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique (Read 5111 times)

Offline jwolff

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Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
« on: February 11, 2004, 11:40:53 PM »
in the opening 32 measures or so, should it be played as a left-hand crossover to hit the high A flat?  

Then, when the melody begins, I have been playing that with alternating hands in the same pattern.  Is this correct?  This song is much harder than it initally looks.  

Unrelated question:  I have Chopin's Ocean Etude 99% finished, but i want to hear a professional recording of it.  Any suggestions on the best interpretations?

Offline chopiabin

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #1 on: February 12, 2004, 01:33:42 AM »
There are tons of great interpretations, like Ashkenazy's first recording of them, Cziffra's, and tons of others, but a very good (especially on the Oceans) and readily available one is the recording by Murray Perahia.

Offline eddie92099

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #2 on: February 12, 2004, 01:48:04 AM »
Quote
This song is much harder than it initally looks


Song?
Ed

Offline Clare

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #3 on: February 12, 2004, 01:57:14 AM »
Uh, not sure what you mean, but during the first bars without a melody, there's no crossing, but when you get to the melody, you gotta play each note of the melody with alternating hands. I think that is what you were saying you did anyway.
I thought the piece was way easier than it looked. I mean, it's totally hard, but when you wrap your head around it, it feels kinda logical and comfy when you're playing it and it's really easy to memorise.

Offline Piazzo22

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #4 on: February 12, 2004, 02:28:20 AM »
Eddie, how old are you? really.
August Förster (Löbau) owner.

Offline comme_le_vent

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #5 on: February 12, 2004, 04:59:11 AM »
lol, ed is actually 17 - obviously he has wisdom that defies that age. but he never uses it!   ;)

the best recording of the ocean etude is cziffra's, for my money.
also check out hamelin's superb reading of godowsky's left hand version.
http://www.chopinmusic.net/sdc/

Great artists aim for perfection, while knowing that perfection itself is impossible, it is the driving force for them to be the best they can be - MC Hammer

Offline krenske

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #6 on: February 12, 2004, 12:19:59 PM »
sighs!
"Horowitz died so Krenske could live."

Offline eddie92099

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #7 on: February 12, 2004, 10:03:59 PM »
Quote
Eddie, how old are you? really.


17 years. It didn't take me 17 years to learn that Un Sospiro wasn't a song though,
Ed

Offline bop...boo

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #8 on: February 12, 2004, 10:04:48 PM »
Quote


the best recording of the ocean etude is cziffra's, for my money.
quote]

I love Cziffra and all but I must disagree he did a poor job with this etude.  Much too harsh

Offline bernhard

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #9 on: February 13, 2004, 12:38:52 AM »
Good recordings of Ocean etudes:
Alfred Cortot
Earl Wild

Un sospiro:
Jorge Bolet
The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side. (Hunter Thompson)

Offline krenske

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #10 on: February 13, 2004, 09:40:11 AM »
anyone heard of Earl Grey?
"Horowitz died so Krenske could live."

Offline eddie92099

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #11 on: February 13, 2004, 08:33:54 PM »
Quote
anyone heard of Earl Grey?


He's not my cup of tea,
Ed


Offline thracozaag

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #12 on: February 13, 2004, 10:28:32 PM »
Quote


He's not my cup of tea,
Ed



 *GROAN*
"We have to reach a certain level before we realize how small we are."--Georges Cziffra

Offline thracozaag

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #13 on: February 13, 2004, 10:39:29 PM »
Best Oceans I've heard:
Cziffra
Cortot
Sokolov
The Tormentor

Cziffra also plays a wonderful Un Sospiro.
"We have to reach a certain level before we realize how small we are."--Georges Cziffra

Offline chopiabin

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #14 on: February 13, 2004, 10:57:47 PM »
Who's the Tormentor?

Offline eddie92099

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #15 on: February 13, 2004, 10:59:20 PM »
Quote
Who's the Tormentor?


MT,
Ed

Offline allchopin

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #16 on: February 13, 2004, 11:07:17 PM »
I like Horowitz's boomy #12 - he rages.
A modern house without a flush toilet... uncanny.

Offline trunks

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #17 on: April 15, 2004, 11:54:40 AM »
Agreed, Bernhard. While I am not for Bolet on each and every Liszt piece he had ever recorded, he played the un sospiro beautifully, as he did its two predecessors, the il lamento and the la leggierezza.

To jwolff (and others who might wish to learn this wonderful piece):
My suggestion is to seat yourself slightly shifted toward the right, perhaps experiment with half-an-octave to at most one octave right from the middle of the keyboard. That is what I do, in order to facilitate the very frequent crossing over of the left hand.

Enjoy, and feel this piece with all your heart. This is one of the few pieces that can bring tears while listening to a recording and even while I am playing it myself. Others include its first predecessor, the il lamento, and Liszt's own Sonetto 104 del Petrarca.
Peter (Hong Kong)
part-time piano tutor
amateur classical concert pianist

Offline donjuan

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #18 on: April 16, 2004, 01:50:15 AM »
Jorge Bolets recording of Un Sospiro is , in my opinion - too boring.  he has a way of bringing out the sparkling, brilliant tones of the piano (a becker, I might add), but the music fails to move forward.  I prefer David Helfgott's version, or leslie howard.  Jorge Bolet is excellent in Liszt's "Fountains of the Villa d"Este" or the Dante Sonata.  He's great in many pieces, BUT NOT FOR UN SOSPIRO, SPOSALIZIO, TARANTELLA, or anything else requiring strong ability to complete a musical phrase. (actually, tarantella wasn't that bad..)

Now as for the Ocean Etude of Chopin, I recommend Cziffra, like many many previous posters.  the melody is clearly projected, and dynamics are vivid.  You may have seen me say this in other postings, but CZIFFRA CAN MOVE MOUNTAINS with his playing.      

Offline erak

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #19 on: April 16, 2004, 01:57:33 AM »
You prefer Helfgott's over Bolet's?

....

Offline donjuan

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Re: Liszt's Etude "Un Sospiro" technique
«Reply #20 on: April 16, 2004, 02:06:16 AM »
You prefer Helfgott's over Bolet's?  

yes, absolutely!!  Like I said, Bolet is, at times, quite boring.  Helfgott successfully captures the mood of the music and does well to represent LIszt's virtuosity.  Bolet tends to indulge too much in a single tone.  I admit, I enjoy doing this too.  BUT not in performance.  People need music to move forward.