Piano Forum



The Complete Piano Works of 15 Composers
Piano Streetís digital sheet music library is constantly growing. With the additions made during the past months, we now offer the complete solo piano works by fifteen of the most famous Classical, Romantic and Impressionist composers in the webís most pianist friendly user interface. Read more >>

Topic: chopin prelude #6  (Read 5685 times)

Offline pianistimo

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 12143
chopin prelude #6
on: February 02, 2007, 09:17:59 PM
#6
Sign up for a Piano Street membership to download this piano score.
Sign up for FREE! >>

Offline rachfan

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3026
Re: chopin prelude #6
Reply #1 on: February 03, 2007, 12:58:21 AM
Ah, more Chopin Preludes.  This one is well on its way.  If I were to make one suggestion, it would be to make more or the LH crescendos and diminuendos.  They create a "swell" affect, or a flow and an ebb to be more precise.  Those are the most important dynamic effects in the piece in my opinion. especially where the LH is the melody in those places.  They in no way affect the execution of the RH, almost an ostinato accompaniment.  I've put my recording here so you can check it out if you wish. 

Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities.

Offline pianistimo

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 12143
Re: chopin prelude #6
Reply #2 on: February 03, 2007, 02:58:52 AM
yet - sotto voce means 'under voice' - so it isn't really supposed to be terribly swelling.  but, i think i can do a little more without it being too  much.  thank you for listening and friendly advice. 

Offline rachfan

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3026
Re: chopin prelude #6
Reply #3 on: February 03, 2007, 03:39:15 AM
Yes, I agree.   Like Bolet used to say, you don't have to hit someone over the head with a two by four to get an effect across to them.  And like we agreed yesterday, a dynamic is relative to the general context of the piece as you interpret it, and can be completely different in another piece.  So yes, you can do that ebb and flow so that it fits in nicely.  It doesn't have to be jarring or disproportionate to the setting. 
Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities.
For more information about this topic, click search below!
 

Logo light pianostreet.com - the website for classical pianists, piano teachers, students and piano music enthusiasts.

Subscribe for unlimited access

Sign up

Follow us

Piano Street Digicert