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Topic: Flute Sonata Transcription  (Read 2009 times)

Offline zhiliang

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Flute Sonata Transcription
on: February 19, 2004, 09:12:02 AM
Hi everyone,

I am looking for a score of a piece but i do not know the exact name of the song. Do you know of a piano transcription of a Bach's Flute Sonta? Can anyone help me on this?

Thanks

Zhiliang
-- arthur rubinstein --

Offline bernhard

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Re: Flute Sonata Transcription
Reply #1 on: February 19, 2004, 01:27:04 PM
J. S. Bach wrote 7 sonatas for transverse flute (which had just been invented and was still made of wood):

BWV 1030 in B minor (for flute and obbligato cembalo)
BWV 1032 in A major (for flute and obbligato cembalo)
BWV 1034 in E minor (for flute and continuo)
BWV 1035 in E major (for flute and continuo)
BWV 1039 in G major (for 2 flutes and continuo)
BWV 1013 in A minor (for unaccompanied flute)
The trio sonata in C minor from the Musical Offering.

Then there are these three sonatas which are often attributed to Bach, but most scholars now agree were not probably composed by him.

BWV 1031 in Eb major (for flute and cembalo)
BWV 1020 in G minor (for flute and cembalo)
BWV 1033 in C major (for flute and continuo)

So which one do you have in mind?

I will guess you are referring to the “Siciliano” – second movement of the BWV 1031 sonata – a piece that is well known and much played (even Jacques Loussier has made a jazzy version of it!). It goes: D – Eb - D – D – G – Eb – C etc.

If so, there are a number of piano transcriptions available. On the other hand, you can just get the score and play it straight from there - It is very easy - (play the cembalo/piano part with the left hand and the flute part with the right, sharing between hands when the span becomes impossible).

Best wishes,
Bernhard.
The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side. (Hunter Thompson)

Offline Beet9

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Re: Flute Sonata Transcription
Reply #2 on: February 22, 2004, 04:22:34 AM
Bernhard - how do you know so much??!!
"what's with all the dumb quotes?"

Offline bernhard

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Re: Flute Sonata Transcription
Reply #3 on: February 22, 2004, 04:53:41 PM
Quote
Bernhard - how do you know so much??!!


Er… a lifetime of study? ;)

Actually to know everything you only need to know a little. But to learn this little that you need in order to know everything will take a lifetime of study. Most importantly, learn how to learn.

Best wishes,
Bernhard.

The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side. (Hunter Thompson)

Offline zhiliang

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Re: Flute Sonata Transcription
Reply #4 on: February 23, 2004, 05:33:31 AM
Quote
J. S. Bach wrote 7 sonatas for transverse flute (which had just been invented and was still made of wood):

BWV 1030 in B minor (for flute and obbligato cembalo)
BWV 1032 in A major (for flute and obbligato cembalo)
BWV 1034 in E minor (for flute and continuo)
BWV 1035 in E major (for flute and continuo)
BWV 1039 in G major (for 2 flutes and continuo)
BWV 1013 in A minor (for unaccompanied flute)
The trio sonata in C minor from the Musical Offering.

Then there are these three sonatas which are often attributed to Bach, but most scholars now agree were not probably composed by him.

BWV 1031 in Eb major (for flute and cembalo)
BWV 1020 in G minor (for flute and cembalo)
BWV 1033 in C major (for flute and continuo)

So which one do you have in mind?

I will guess you are referring to the “Siciliano” – second movement of the BWV 1031 sonata – a piece that is well known and much played (even Jacques Loussier has made a jazzy version of it!). It goes: D – Eb - D – D – G – Eb – C etc.

If so, there are a number of piano transcriptions available. On the other hand, you can just get the score and play it straight from there - It is very easy - (play the cembalo/piano part with the left hand and the flute part with the right, sharing between hands when the span becomes impossible).

Best wishes,
Bernhard.


Hmmm... thats a very long list. Actually i have only heard it once played by someone and ir remembered that it was very good but i am sure the score for it is really rare. Has all of those pieces you mentioned being transcribled for the piano already?

Regards,

Zhiliang
-- arthur rubinstein --

Offline bernhard

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Re: Flute Sonata Transcription
Reply #5 on: February 23, 2004, 01:51:54 PM
Quote


Hmmm... thats a very long list. Actually i have only heard it once played by someone and ir remembered that it was very good but i am sure the score for it is really rare. Has all of those pieces you mentioned being transcribled for the piano already?

Regards,

Zhiliang


I guess you would have to listen to them and see if any of them righs a bell. Did the pianist you heard olayed a whole sonata, or just a movement?

As I said the most famous is the Siciliano from sonata 1031. If the pianist played just a movement chances are that this is waht he played.

None of the original sonata scores are particularly rare. However a trancription of them may well be. Unless you can give more precise information, that is really all I can say.

Best wishes,
Bernhard.
The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side. (Hunter Thompson)
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