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Specific Mechanical Problem (Read 1677 times)

Offline Motrax

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Specific Mechanical Problem
« on: April 04, 2004, 11:29:10 PM »
Greetings,

I'm using a Young Chang baby grand (5' 6'', I think), and it's served me very well for quite a number of years now.

Unfortunately, recently the B next to middle C gets stuck sometimes - the key just won't come back up after I press it down. It's terribly aggrivating... would any of you know why this happens or how I can fix it? I tried taking my keyboard apart, but some things moved which weren't supposed to, so I ceased trying to do something which should be left to those who know what they are doing.  :)

Many thanks,

Motrax
"I always make sure that the lid over the keyboard is open before I start to play." --  Artur Schnabel, after being asked for the secret of piano playing.

Offline Joffrey

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Re: Specific Mechanical Problem
«Reply #1 on: April 05, 2004, 11:31:38 AM »
There can be hundreds of reasons why this happens. (um, well.. a lot anyway) Get a piano tech to look at it, and for the love of god, don't try anything yourself...

Joff

Offline faulty_damper

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Re: Specific Mechanical Problem
«Reply #2 on: April 08, 2004, 11:38:39 AM »
You should consult your piano technician.  By "your", I assume you do have a technician that you have consulted before.  If not, you should ask someone for a reference of a technician that is exceptionally competent.

The problem you experience happens with old pianos.  By old, I mean anything that's been played constantly to the point where parts start wearing down and become less efficient.  This "wearing" occurs at different rates depended on environment and the manufacturer.  The problem could be the action that is not functioning smoothly so it sticks.  Either the action is not properly aligned or is worn so it sticks.

Short answer:  Consult your technician.

Offline jr11

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Re: Specific Mechanical Problem
«Reply #3 on: April 08, 2004, 05:51:19 PM »
I have similar problems occur, and strangely, it seems to happen right after the piano tech leaves! On my piano,  there is a slight warp in the facing board that runs in front of the base of the keys (just in front of the player's hips when sitting at the piano). The board is supported by the blocks at either end (by the low A on left and high C on right) so outer notes are fine, but the warp goes in towards the keys and is at its peak in the middle.

Look straight down between the edge of the keys and this board to observe the difference in clearance from the mid keys to the end keys. If it is noticable, WITH YOUR HANDS ONLY pull out slightly on the board at the right block and insert a paper wedge several folds thick. Repeat at the other end, and see if that helps.

When you have your piano tuned, make sure to tell the tech this problem exists, or it may show up shortly after they leave. Good luck!

Offline donjuan

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Re: Specific Mechanical Problem
«Reply #4 on: April 19, 2004, 02:48:53 AM »
I also had a problem like this, but shortly after getting the piano new.  I phoned the tech, and he said a spring not properly placed by the geniuses at the warehouse were responsible.  Like many previous people have said, don't screw around with it, let someone who knows what he/she is doing have a look at it.  Pianists in general, know the least about their instruments. (unlike guitarists or violinists)

Offline Motrax

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Re: Specific Mechanical Problem
«Reply #5 on: April 23, 2004, 12:38:06 AM »
Quote
Pianists in general, know the least about their instruments. (unlike guitarists or violinists)


Well, altough I'd be a hypocrite to disagree (as I know very little about my piano), I disagree.  :) Since the only thing I do more than playing piano is sleeping, I should become rather knowledgeable about the instrument I use. I don't have the money to call for a tuner on a weekly basis. Even once a month is rather expensive for me. So it'd be better if I learned to fix up my own piano than having to rely on other people to do it for me.

Which means I try to learn from the tuner next time he comes, I'm not doing anything foolish now!

And thanks a lot for the responses, they helped a bunch!
"I always make sure that the lid over the keyboard is open before I start to play." --  Artur Schnabel, after being asked for the secret of piano playing.

Offline jr11

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Re: Specific Mechanical Problem
«Reply #6 on: April 23, 2004, 01:27:57 AM »
Motrax:  there are a number of books available on the subject. Just like a car, there are things that anyone can do (given the proper tools) and other things you can really mess up if you screw with them. Definately leave the action alone, especially the dampers... I am told the quality of damper work is what seperates the good techs from the bad.

Tuning is a pretty basic skill... with the help of an electronic chromatic tuner and some background reading, most people could tackle the job.

Piano repair is a very different skill than piano playing; good techs are mechanical types with analytical minds, not artists. Rare is the person who can excel at both skills.

Offline donjuan

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Re: Specific Mechanical Problem
«Reply #7 on: April 23, 2004, 02:13:45 AM »
Quote
I don't have the money to call for a tuner on a weekly basis. Even once a month is rather expensive for me.


WHAT??
you mean to tell me you would like to have your piano tuned every week?  once a year is adequate- twice a year is, what I consider unnecessary.  Which country do you live in, Motrax?  Where I live -Canada- we only need to tune in the wintertime. tuning at any other part of the year is a waste of time and money because the piano will go out again REALLY quickly.  
donjuan  

Offline Motrax

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Re: Specific Mechanical Problem
«Reply #8 on: April 24, 2004, 01:44:22 AM »
Oh, I was just talking about mechanical problems. Of course my piano doesn't need weekly tunings (if it did, I'd probably save money by buying a new one). I'm just saying that if a hammer gets stuck every now and then, or a key, it'd be easier if I could fix it myself rather than having to wait a few months for the tuner, or having to call the tuner frequently to fix little problems all the time.

Sorry I wasn't clear.  :P
"I always make sure that the lid over the keyboard is open before I start to play." --  Artur Schnabel, after being asked for the secret of piano playing.