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Chopin Op.25 No.10 (Read 3856 times)

Offline ahkow

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Chopin Op.25 No.10
« on: November 29, 2007, 02:17:44 PM »
My teacher says that i play the first Octaves too softly when i play the first section of this etude. when i try to play it any louder, he says that i'm banging it. The problem with it is that while he does demonstrate it to me (With a great tone quality) he doesnt tell me how to do it. Does anyone here know how to play it with a full tone?

 In the second section he keeps saying that i don't play musical enough. the problem with my teacher is that he expects you to do the technique on your own, similar to Liszt who said: "Wash your dirty linen at home) while he teaches you on the art of interpretation.

I think that the Octave etude is harder than it looks/sounds.

piano sheet music of Etude


Offline Kassaa

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Re: Chopin Op.25 No.10
«Reply #1 on: November 29, 2007, 03:29:34 PM »
Play deep into the keys without, completely relax your wrist, arm and shoulders when playing them and try to play it as loud as possible while keeping your fingers on the keys.
Everything will pass, and the world will perish but the Waldstein Sonata will remain.

Offline ahkow

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Re: Chopin Op.25 No.10
«Reply #2 on: November 29, 2007, 03:38:29 PM »
thanks i'll try it out

Offline thierry13

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Re: Chopin Op.25 No.10
«Reply #3 on: December 01, 2007, 12:24:13 AM »
You have to feel the bottom of the keys from your back, and release any tension/weigth as soon as you hit it, but you HAVE to feel it. The hard sound comes from a speedy and without weigth attack, and it's worse if you do not release tension as soon as you hit the bottom of the keys. Try to look carefully how your teachers body works and what happens when he gets in contact with the key.

Offline ahkow

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Re: Chopin Op.25 No.10
«Reply #4 on: December 01, 2007, 12:31:33 AM »
I haven't seen how my teacher moves but I understand the one about releasing tension. I read somewhere (Cant Remember) that someone once said something like "Do not use any extra force one you have hit the keys because no more sound will come out". I suppose that this is to conserve energy and also so that the muscles can be working someplace else (e.g.: the use of all 5 fingers in Chasse Neige - 1 and 5 holds an Octave, fingering 2&3, 4 do tremolo)

Offline thierry13

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Re: Chopin Op.25 No.10
«Reply #5 on: December 01, 2007, 12:44:32 AM »
It does help for that purpose, but it's not even a matter of that. It's a question of getting a nice and round tone. If you do not release everything as soon as you touch the bottom of the key your sound will be rough and stiff.

Offline ahkow

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Re: Chopin Op.25 No.10
«Reply #6 on: December 01, 2007, 01:01:23 AM »
Oh. i havent tried that yet. Thanks!

Offline opus132

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Re: Chopin Op.25 No.10
«Reply #7 on: December 01, 2007, 03:24:58 AM »
Hi, I'm a piano teacher that's new to this forum. Anyways, I suspect that the problem you're having with the sound of the octaves might be due to your voicing of them....Just my two cents...

Offline thierry13

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Re: Chopin Op.25 No.10
«Reply #8 on: December 01, 2007, 04:11:32 AM »
Hi, I'm a piano teacher that's new to this forum. Anyways, I suspect that the problem you're having with the sound of the octaves might be due to your voicing of them....Just my two cents...

While I personally think he has got to work on the sound of each octave to accomplish a truly masterful performance, I know what you mean and agree to a certain extent ! Phrasing the octaves correctfully does help keep the arm loose and definately makes your sound more musical, but there is a tone quality to acquire before that.

Offline ahkow

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Re: Chopin Op.25 No.10
«Reply #9 on: December 01, 2007, 04:44:46 AM »
Voicing's not really a problem for me. Most of the time either I'm too soft or too harsh. The stretches in this piece are giving me quite a problem too. I think i might switch to something else for the time being.

Offline jinfiesto

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Re: Chopin Op.25 No.10
«Reply #10 on: December 04, 2007, 02:47:15 AM »
Voice to the thumbs. That'll fix your problem. That, and play with the weight in your arms. Whacking with your wrist will make it sound harsh. I know this sounds inane and awfully basic, but I guarantee you it's your problem.

Offline ahkow

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Re: Chopin Op.25 No.10
«Reply #11 on: December 09, 2007, 05:19:25 AM »
How about the inner notes? Do you all hold them to the full value or lift up after striking it?

Offline thierry13

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Re: Chopin Op.25 No.10
«Reply #12 on: December 09, 2007, 07:23:25 AM »
How about the inner notes? Do you all hold them to the full value or lift up after striking it?

There are lots of way to do this, but I'd suggest to at least be able to hold them to the full value, and then look for other ways/pedalling combos and w/e your teacher suggests.

Offline ahkow

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Re: Chopin Op.25 No.10
«Reply #13 on: December 09, 2007, 11:35:25 PM »
My teacher also advices me to hold on. its an uncomfortable stretch to do it though

Offline iratior

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Re: Chopin Op.25 No.10
«Reply #14 on: April 27, 2011, 04:33:35 AM »
Now here's an interesting topic, not commented on since December 9, 2007.  Chopin's etude in octaves.  What are people's opinions as to the emotions this piece unleashes?  I get the feeling it's all about rage and nostalgia.  I find I can play this piece in such a way as to make it sound the way I want it to (unlike opus 25-4, the notes were right).  My late significant other used to be very disturbed by it -- said the music seemed to be crawling through his veins.  I took that as a compliment, though in kindness I stopped playing it when he was around, and forgot about it otherwise.