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Topic: Any advice on playing Nocturne in E minor?  (Read 3777 times)

Offline ishy14

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Any advice on playing Nocturne in E minor?
on: December 18, 2007, 01:58:19 AM
I'm learning a new piece, Nocturne in E minor-Chopin. My teacher said she cant help me much on some parts any advice on learning it?
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Offline ramseytheii

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Re: Any advice on playing Nocturne in E minor?
Reply #1 on: December 18, 2007, 02:05:15 AM
Get a new teacher

Walter Ramsey


Offline amelialw

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Re: Any advice on playing Nocturne in E minor?
Reply #2 on: December 18, 2007, 05:12:59 AM
Get a new teacher

Walter Ramsey




I agree, if she can't help you, get a new teacher
J.S Bach Italian Concerto,Beethoven Sonata op.2 no.2,Mozart Sonatas K.330&333,Chopin Scherzo no.2,Etude op.10 no.12&Fantasie Impromptu

Offline m1469

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Re: Any advice on playing Nocturne in E minor?
Reply #3 on: December 18, 2007, 05:29:11 AM
Actually, I don't entirely agree with the last two posts.  Sure, find somebody who can help you with this piece specifically, but it doesn't mean you should just dump your current teacher altogether.  I have experienced teachers referring students to other students for help on particular repertoire.  Well, if the students being referred to for help with specific repertoire were initially taught by the teacher, why is the teacher referring students to other students for help ? 

Each individual will have something unique to offer and, if somebody is more familiar with a particular composer or style (or piece), perhaps it's a good choice to study that piece with that person. 

Anyway, what can't she help you with, exactly ?  I guess she can't play it for you anyway.
"The greatest thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving"  ~Oliver Wendell Holmes

Offline amelialw

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Re: Any advice on playing Nocturne in E minor?
Reply #4 on: December 18, 2007, 05:46:05 AM
Actually, I don't entirely agree with the last two posts.  Sure, find somebody who can help you with this piece specifically, but it doesn't mean you should just dump your current teacher altogether.  I have experienced teachers referring students to other students for help on particular repertoire.  Well, if the students being referred to for help with specific repertoire were initially taught by the teacher, why is the teacher referring students to other students for help ? 

Each individual will have something unique to offer and, if somebody is more familiar with a particular composer or style (or piece), perhaps it's a good choice to study that piece with that person. 

Anyway, what can't she help you with, exactly ?  I guess she can't play it for you anyway.

oh yeah, what m1469 says is true.

Is your current teacher still a piano student? if so that would explain it.

advice: I learnt this piece maybe 1 and a half years back, still have the notes I took. Would you like me to scan it in and email it to you?
J.S Bach Italian Concerto,Beethoven Sonata op.2 no.2,Mozart Sonatas K.330&333,Chopin Scherzo no.2,Etude op.10 no.12&Fantasie Impromptu

Offline slobone

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Re: Any advice on playing Nocturne in E minor?
Reply #5 on: December 18, 2007, 07:23:29 PM
My advice is to listen to as many recordings as you can and see how some famous pianists have addressed the piece. I don't even think it's a terrible idea for a student to actually try to imitate a specific performance, although I'm sure there are many here who'd disagree with that.

But what is the difficulty you need help with? Learning the notes, tempo, dynamics, how to play rubato? (Or is it perchance the 11-against-3 part?  :) ) This is one of Chopin's most familiar (and easiest) pieces, so it needs a little "something" to make it interesting.

PS I played it in a recital in front of my whole high school, and all anybody noticed was that my leg was shaking the whole time...  :-[
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