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Topic: Beethoven's 7th symphony  (Read 2027 times)

Offline cziffra

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Beethoven's 7th symphony
on: April 25, 2004, 02:46:21 PM
i heard this live yesterday IN THE FRONT ROW!  it was brilliant!  i absolutely love this piece.

any thoughts or stories about it?
What it all comes down to is that one does not play the piano with one’s fingers; one plays the piano with one’s mind.-  Glenn Gould

Offline Rach3

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Re: Beethoven's 7th symphony
Reply #1 on: April 26, 2004, 08:06:02 AM
agreed, brilliant piece, who conducted?

a story? the first time it was performed (Vienna?), the audience made the orchestra repeat the adagio in mid-symphony
"Never look at the trombones, it only encourages them."
--Richard Wagner

Offline aileigc

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Re: Beethoven's 7th symphony
Reply #2 on: April 29, 2004, 07:03:04 PM
I love it. I cry to it. The second mov is the absolute dream of music. So tragically beautiful.

And, please don't take it lightly, this is not meant to be a joke,  the basis for my theory that Beethoven's music is very orgasmic. The two crescendos in the Adagio (around minute 2:40 and minute 6, if I recall - Rene Leibowitz conducting), are very similar to a sexual extasis.... Male, because I'm not a woman and have no idea if women's experience is similar to men's. Anyway, the way we feel the clymax coming, how it is retarded to the point of exhaustion and not being able to hold it any longer (especially the second time), and then the absolute release of a flow of joy
reminds me every time of an orgasm. The movement merely dies off in the final two minutes after that explosion.
Sorry for the words, I don't wish this to be shocking. It's just a theory. I've heard this kind of construction in other Beethoven's pieces, but strangely never noticed it anywhere else.

Let me state this again: Beethoven is my favourite composer by far, so I don't mean this as derogatory. It's merely an observation.

Alex

Offline cziffra

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Re: Beethoven's 7th symphony
Reply #3 on: May 01, 2004, 02:56:35 PM
certainly a unique theory...

chritopher franklin was the conductor, and he was BRILLIANT.
What it all comes down to is that one does not play the piano with one’s fingers; one plays the piano with one’s mind.-  Glenn Gould
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