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A Scottish-Viennese Odyssey
When Dutch pianist Ronald Brautigam was in Sweden in September to play two piano concertos with Helsingborg Symphony Orchestra, we talked with the performer in the midst of rehearsal. The concert was recorded for Helsingborg Concert Hall Play series and - according to Brautigam - Sally Beamish's 1st piano concerto named "Hill Stanzas" and Mozart's 17th, make a very fine musical combination in a concert program. Read more >>

Topic: Sibelius  (Read 2510 times)

Offline comme_le_vent

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Sibelius
on: May 07, 2004, 11:13:15 PM
to tie in with my other posts about composers who are better known for their non-piano music, i wondered what you guys thought about the piano music by Sibelius.
https://www.chopinmusic.net/sdc/

Great artists aim for perfection, while knowing that perfection itself is impossible, it is the driving force for them to be the best they can be - MC Hammer

Offline L.K.

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Re: Sibelius
Reply #1 on: May 08, 2004, 12:07:52 AM
Well, many people say it's very unpianistic and low in quality. And I have to agree, most of it is. It's also quite easy, so no virtuoso bangbang here. I have only played 2 pieces by him and I don't want to play any more.   :P

Offline comme_le_vent

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Re: Sibelius
Reply #2 on: May 08, 2004, 12:19:48 AM
i have his complete piano music on 4 cds, and some of it is really special stuff, you just need to listen to more and pick the ones that grab you most.
https://www.chopinmusic.net/sdc/

Great artists aim for perfection, while knowing that perfection itself is impossible, it is the driving force for them to be the best they can be - MC Hammer

Offline Logar

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Re: Sibelius
Reply #3 on: May 08, 2004, 01:34:08 AM
The thing about Sibelius was that he wrote his notes very differently from other composert. Sinding wrote the notes from how we would "sing" the melody. This oftens leads to weird rhytms etc... Just take a look at his famous Finlandia...
To be or not to be - that is the question!

Offline DarkWind

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Re: Sibelius
Reply #4 on: May 08, 2004, 06:16:28 AM
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Sinding wrote the notes from how we would "sing" the melody. This oftens leads to weird rhytms etc... Just take a look at his famous Finlandia...


Where'd Sinding come from? :P Also, I don't understand by what you mean, singing the melody...

Offline Logar

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Re: Sibelius
Reply #5 on: May 08, 2004, 10:43:13 AM
Well it is kinda difficult to really explain it - But try find some scores from him  and you will notice it. He is from Finland.
To be or not to be - that is the question!

Offline comme_le_vent

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Re: Sibelius
Reply #6 on: May 08, 2004, 07:16:04 PM
sinding wrote the lovely 'rustles of spring' i think.

and i think scandinavian music rules, it seems so melancholic and it gives 'chills'  ;D
https://www.chopinmusic.net/sdc/

Great artists aim for perfection, while knowing that perfection itself is impossible, it is the driving force for them to be the best they can be - MC Hammer

Offline ravel

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Re: Sibelius
Reply #7 on: May 09, 2004, 03:40:26 AM
can u tell me particular pieces comme_le_vent,  which u found special. i wanna hear them out .

Shagdac

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Re: Sibelius
Reply #8 on: May 09, 2004, 01:04:14 PM
The Tempest was popular, and most of his orchestral works I think. I have not had the opportunity to hear all of his works, but what I have been exposed to, I enjoyed.

S. :)

Offline Logar

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Re: Sibelius
Reply #9 on: May 09, 2004, 02:04:56 PM
I love his Valse Triste and Romance in d-flat.
Very melancholic melodies.
To be or not to be - that is the question!

Offline JeffL

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Re: Sibelius
Reply #10 on: May 09, 2004, 04:22:04 PM
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Well it is kinda difficult to really explain it - But try find some scores from him  and you will notice it. He is from Finland.


Sinding is a Norwegian composer. I don't really understand what you mean regarding the "singing" aspect. I have a lot of his piano music and, to me, a lot of it seems rather "overwritten". He often writes in massive chords in both hands-not unpleasant though. The Concerto in Dflat is definitely worth taking a look at.
Sibelius' piano music, I think, is unjustifiably neglected. It consists, in the main, of salon-type miniatures but his individual voice is still to be heard. I don't regard those pieces I know as particularly un-pianistic.

Offline anda

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Re: Sibelius
Reply #11 on: May 10, 2004, 04:20:47 PM
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I love his Valse Triste and Romance in d-flat.
Very melancholic melodies.


wonderful works, i love them too - but the valse is transcribed (the romance too i think, but i'm not sure), the're originally for orchestra. still wonderful...

Offline willcowskitz

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Re: Sibelius
Reply #12 on: May 17, 2004, 10:44:01 PM
Just thought I'd throw in a little knowledge about Sibelius' music.

He was mostly inspired by the nature, and one shouldn't overlook this fact when listening to his music. He walked in the woods and listened to the nature, not to mention he had asynesthaesia (however you spell it) meaning he could directly associate certain sounds/frequencies with certain colours. Now take this phenomenon and imagine him walking through a forest listening to birds, looking at the colourful nature and watching the swans take off from the lake.

Sometimes when you don't understand certain music, it helps to understand the composer first. What comes to his music being "unpianistic" - take Liszt for example, he mainly composed for the piano alone, yet he composed for it as if it was an orchestra. Compare that to Chopin's piano music, and Liszt is unpianistic. Who cares?

JK

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Re: Sibelius
Reply #13 on: May 18, 2004, 02:26:15 AM
I absolutely love Sibelius' music, the symphonies especially. As for his piano music, I have played his piano sonata in F, this is a very interesting work and has a fantastic last movement. If you want to try some Sibelius piano music this is the piece to look at! :) It's his longest piano composition and to understand the way he writes for piano I think it is very important to listen to his orchestral music as the textures and piano writing are very orchestral.

Scandinavian music is very interesting and it is certainly very distinctive, just look at Griegs' solo piano works.
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