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Digital Piano/MIDI functionality (Read 2232 times)

Offline goalevan

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Digital Piano/MIDI functionality
« on: May 19, 2004, 03:59:36 AM »
Anybody own a digital piano and hook it up to your computer? I was wondering what the purpose of this would be... what sort of things would you be able to do?

Offline willcowskitz

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Re: Digital Piano/MIDI functionality
«Reply #1 on: May 19, 2004, 04:27:24 AM »
You could connect the input (from the piano to computer) with software that handles the sound and runs it through an auditory effect, or connect it with notation software and turn compositions into notes by only playing through and then editing afterwards to perfect them. If you use computer for making music, the MIDI keyboard is a great tool for making the process easier. I think you can also make the piano play MIDI files at alterable tempo (which makes practicing a whole lot easier if you are not into reading notes, if the piano has a light for every key that lits up when you press it).

So its useful mostly if you're a computer musician or just like composing. All I could think of.

Offline xvimbi

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Re: Digital Piano/MIDI functionality
«Reply #2 on: May 19, 2004, 04:47:38 AM »
1. Play your P-120 through a sound system other than the one built into the keyboard (computer not necessarily required)
2. Conrol sound samples running on your computer. I use my Yamaha PF500 together with GarageBand on a Mac. Even the puny piano sound samples that come with this $49 software beat the built-in sounds in many aspects. Connect it to professional samples, such as one of the magnificent Bösendorfer 290's, and you won't believe your ears (well, compared to the built-in sounds of a P-120, that is, but if you have a really good sound system, then it even compares to the real thing).
3. Composing. Advanced notation software (e.g. Sibelius) writes down exactly what you play in real time - some editing required - download their trial version.
4. Practicing. Some software lets you play from score displayed on a computer and follows you, noting mistakes and scrolling ahead when necessary; no page-turning required
5. Play a MIDI file through your keyboard. Download thousands of MIDI files and have them reproduced with your favorite settings. One can find all kinds of pieces that others have recorded, from simple ones to entire sonatas and concertos. Check out Sibelius' Scorch system: you load sheet music into Sibelius and have it played. Such music is exactly reproduced, so it lacks color and all the emotional aspects, but it can help a lot to figure out a piece; e.g. you can play only certain voices or slow it down and so on. Mind you, one does not need a keyboard for that.
6. Recording. Record either the original sound that the keyboard produces (make mp3's), or just store the MIDI information. It helps to hear oneself play. Using a digital piano for that is easier than dragging a microphone around.
7. Make CDs and sell them for big bucks. Send your renditions to family & friends or to your teacher asking why that phrase sounds so crappy and how one should really play it. I use GarageBand on a Mac for recording. If I make a mistake, heehee, I move the note around a bit to change its pitch, duration or loudness, whatever...
One can also assemble whole symphonies by using the keyboard to control sound samples of pretty much any instrument. A lot of (most?) film music and loads of pop music is done that way.

I would suggest using Google to get more info. There is tons out there. Have fun!

Offline goalevan

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Re: Digital Piano/MIDI functionality
«Reply #3 on: May 19, 2004, 05:23:47 AM »
thanks for the info... what would I use to connect the p120 straight to my computer, and how much does the cord cost?

Offline xvimbi

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Re: Digital Piano/MIDI functionality
«Reply #4 on: May 19, 2004, 06:15:28 AM »
MIDI -> Soundcard (depends on the soundcard)
MIDI -> USB (easiest and cheapest option; about ~$25)

Also depends on your operating system.

Go to a GuitarCenter or similar music store and ask.
Check out http://www.midiman.net/index.php
Google for "MIDI USB" etc.
Check out the keyboard forum at Harmony central (http://www.harmony-central.com/)

Offline newsgroupeuan

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Re: Digital Piano/MIDI functionality
«Reply #5 on: May 19, 2004, 09:01:37 PM »
Quote
thanks for the info... what would I use to connect the p120 straight to my computer, and how much does the cord cost?


Costs you (midi -> soundcard) 8-10 quid.  I got a set of steinway sound samples which I use instead of the ones on my digital piano cos it sounds better

the cable depends on your soundcard. I use a midi cable,  while somec computers don't have this socket

Offline goalevan

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Re: Digital Piano/MIDI functionality
«Reply #6 on: May 19, 2004, 09:54:54 PM »
Quote

4. Practicing. Some software lets you play from score displayed on a computer and follows you, noting mistakes and scrolling ahead when necessary; no page-turning required


That sounds like it would be helpful to me, know of any good software for this? Thanks

Offline goalevan

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Re: Digital Piano/MIDI functionality
«Reply #7 on: May 28, 2004, 12:32:24 AM »
Quote
1. Play your P-120 through a sound system other than the one built into the keyboard (computer not necessarily required)
2. Conrol sound samples running on your computer. I use my Yamaha PF500 together with GarageBand on a Mac. Even the puny piano sound samples that come with this $49 software beat the built-in sounds in many aspects. Connect it to professional samples, such as one of the magnificent Bösendorfer 290's, and you won't believe your ears (well, compared to the built-in sounds of a P-120, that is, but if you have a really good sound system, then it even compares to the real thing).
4. Practicing. Some software lets you play from score displayed on a computer and follows you, noting mistakes and scrolling ahead when necessary; no page-turning required


I have some nice speakers and subwoofer for my computer, so here's what I did - I plugged the midi cord into the computer, and I'm using my good speakers plugged into my digital piano. Sounds great, but do you have any idea how to load the higher quality sound samples you mentioned so that my speakers will play them? I've got Cubase and Sibelius.

Offline xvimbi

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Re: Digital Piano/MIDI functionality
«Reply #8 on: May 28, 2004, 09:54:00 PM »
Quote


I have some nice speakers and subwoofer for my computer, so here's what I did - I plugged the midi cord into the computer, and I'm using my good speakers plugged into my digital piano. Sounds great, but do you have any idea how to load the higher quality sound samples you mentioned so that my speakers will play them? I've got Cubase and Sibelius.


You have to connect your piano to the computer through MIDI, have Cubase generate the sound (I believe you can load VST samples) and output it through your computer's soundcard to your speakers.

Offline thierry13

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Re: Digital Piano/MIDI functionality
«Reply #9 on: May 29, 2004, 07:16:14 AM »
You don't need to buy a soundcard, most of the motherboards has a good one integrated, but the price for a soundcard can go from 50 to 400 lol