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Topic: how does this sound for a college audition  (Read 3575 times)

Offline prokanninov

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how does this sound for a college audition
on: May 20, 2004, 09:22:28 PM
Beethoven- Sonata no. 17 (tempest)  d minor
Bach- WTC I Prelude and fugue in Bb Major
Chopin- Etude Op. 25 No.9, Ballade in G minor
Debussy- Prelude No. III
Khatchaturian- Toccata

lemme know what u think please

Offline A.C.

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Re: how does this sound for a college audition
Reply #1 on: May 20, 2004, 09:41:51 PM
Oops...this is a long audition! I'm going to have a long audition too in Sydney next month, hehe  ;D

Op.31 No.2 is a very hard piece both technically and interpretating. Well, you must have good preparation before attending the audition.

The Bach Book I Bb is not an easy piece too, considering the fast running notes in the prelude which must be handled very precisely. The fugue is good too, but isn't that technically hard (doesn't mean not good).

Op.25 No.9 is a good audition piece too, but you must handle it carefully, and need a great heal of slow practice.

The Ballade No.1 doesn't sound like a good audition piece. My piano teacher said that to me as well. I know it is technically difficult, but u cannot really show the panel what they want if you play this piece. I suggest u choosing other.

The Debussy is good, hehe. Khatchaturian's Toccata? No idea at all, rofl!

As I told u above, I'm going to have an audition too, this is my pragramme:

1, Bach - Prelude and Fugue in G Book I
2, Beethoven - Sonata in Eb Op.27 No.1
3, Brahms - Rhapsody in Eb Op.119 No.4
4, Prokofiev - March Op.12 No.1
5, Chopin - Etude Op.10 No.1 or Op.10 No.4 (not yet decided yet)

Anyway, all the best!!
A.C.

Offline dgk88

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Re: how does this sound for a college audition
Reply #2 on: May 21, 2004, 04:03:43 AM
I agree with the ballade, I'd suggest a piece by either brahms or liszt.  Sonetto del petrarcha 104 is a good one by liszt or either of the Rhapsodies by Brahms.

Offline Alp635

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Re: how does this sound for a college audition
Reply #3 on: May 21, 2004, 10:18:42 AM
Prokanninov,

It sounds like a great audition program.  You are entering undergrad college and that repertoire is appropriate.  The tempest is difficult but no more difficult than any other Beethoven sonata.  

YOur Chopin etude choice is perfect, stick with that.  
The Ballade is overplayed but you're only in highschool and not much is going to be expected (no offense) but they are looking for talent and potential.  If you can have just one moment in all those notes that make you stand out, you will be succesful.  Bach is fine as well.  Just play everything really well.  I disagree with Brahms Rhapsodies and Liszt petrarch sonnet...they don't show any more or less than the great 1st Chopin Ballade, with lyrical and fast passagework.  It is an immensely difficult piece with a tough coda.  For me, Chopin is a very difficult composer to pull off, but it makes a wonderful program.

-A

Offline A.C.

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Re: how does this sound for a college audition
Reply #4 on: May 21, 2004, 11:56:25 AM
Quote
The Ballade is overplayed but you're only in highschool and not much is going to be expected (no offense) but they are looking for talent and potential.  If you can have just one moment in all those notes that make you stand out, you will be succesful.  Bach is fine as well.  Just play everything really well.  I disagree with Brahms Rhapsodies and Liszt petrarch sonnet...they don't show any more or less than the great 1st Chopin Ballade, with lyrical and fast passagework.  It is an immensely difficult piece with a tough coda.  For me, Chopin is a very difficult composer to pull off, but it makes a wonderful program.

-A


I do not quite agree with you, as I think that an audition programme should be carefully chosen and revised. You should do the best instead of thinking that they are not expeting much from you. I know that if he plays the Chopin's Ballade really well, he will stand out. However, their are much more other pieces that can make him stand out easier. I do not think playing any Liszt in an audition is a good idea. In my opinion, Chopin's and Brahms' would be a good choice, considering the rich tone and lyrical music. Your programme with this Chopin's Ballade will be wonderful if it is put on the stage. Nevertheless, you're now preparing for an audition.
A.C.

Offline nerd

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Re: how does this sound for a college audition
Reply #5 on: May 21, 2004, 10:20:13 PM
Some formalities first: This is my first post here so hi everybody! ;D

Now that we know each other... I'm having an audition, too (in 1.5 weeks). I've pretty much decided my program but I'd still like to know what you think about it and maybe get some preparation tips (just something general for these very pieces). I don't know what this school is called in the countries you live in. To give you some idea I can tell you that I'm 19 years old. There was no "required pieces" -list so my program doesn't include anything classical (don't like it :P). Here's my program:

- Chopin: Etude Op.25 No.12
- Bach: Prelude & Fugue, WTC II, d minor
- Ravel: Ondine from Gaspard de la nuit
- Rachmaninoff: Etude Op.39 No.1 (I'm not sure about this yet; I've only played it for about 2.5 months now)

Edit: I'd especially like tips for Ondine...
DDN 8)
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