Piano Forum logo
November 15, 2018, 07:16:35 AM *
   Forum Home   Help Search  


Talking Pianos with Trifonov

Can “water practice” along with yoga and stretching enhance performance endurance and pianistic feeling? The luminous Sarah Willis, French horn player in Berliner Philharmoniker meets with Russian star pianist Daniil Trifonov in Hamburg while he is preparing for a recital. Read more >>

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Beethoven 3rd Piano Concerto: Cadenza?  (Read 7799 times)
dnephi
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 1859


« on: September 06, 2008, 02:04:35 AM »

I have recently been assigned the Beethoven 3rd Piano Concerto.  I'm ecstatic- this is some of the greatest music ever written.

1st: Any thoughts on the work as a whole?

2nd, and more importantly: Which cadenza would you play?

My teacher mentioned the Beethoven, but I've heard it called perfunctory.  I have seen the Liszt and wasn't too impressed.  I don't know the Brahms.  I would like to do the Alkan, but I am not sure if it would fit or if I could pull it off in the first place.

Please recommend further choices and comment on those already mentioned.

Thanks,

Daniel
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

For us musicians, the music of Beethoven is the pillar of fire and cloud of mist which guided the Israelites through the desert.  (Roughly quoted, Franz Liszt.)

piano sheet music of Piano Concerto 3
faulty_damper
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 3931


« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2008, 05:38:22 AM »

And the necessary question is? Roll Eyes
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
cmg
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 1042


« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2008, 05:46:17 AM »

I have recently been assigned the Beethoven 3rd Piano Concerto.  I'm ecstatic- this is some of the greatest music ever written.

1st: Any thoughts on the work as a whole?

2nd, and more importantly: Which cadenza would you play?

My teacher mentioned the Beethoven, but I've heard it called perfunctory.  I have seen the Liszt and wasn't too impressed.  I don't know the Brahms.  I would like to do the Alkan, but I am not sure if it would fit or if I could pull it off in the first place.

Please recommend further choices and comment on those already mentioned.

Thanks,

Daniel

If the cadenzas of Beethoven, Liszt, Brahms and Alkan strike you as being not up to your standards, then why not improvise your own?  That's the point of the cadenza anyway, right?

By the way, this concerto is held in the highest regard by everyone.  Whoever said Beethoven's cadenza is "perfunctory" is a fool. 
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Current repertoire:  "Come to Jesus" (in whole-notes)
faulty_damper
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 3931


« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2008, 06:03:44 AM »

Cadenzas have a dual purpose in a concerto:

1. display of facility of the performer
2. enhancing musical material or increasing cohesion of previous and future material

If 1 is prioritized, music can suffer.  (Id est: Liszt.)
If 2 is emphasized and extended with new material, it trivializes the concerto and throws it out of balanced. (Id est: Alkan's.)  Cadenzas should be in proportion to the concerto - neither too short/long nor unbalancing the music with new material.

How many pianists train to improvise a cadenza with these two purposes? Roll Eyes
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
thalbergmad
PS Gold Member
Sr. Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 16184


« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2008, 09:27:48 AM »


By the way, this concerto is held in the highest regard by everyone. 

A bit of a gross generalisation.

I detest it on a cellular basis.

Thal
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Curator/Director
Concerto Preservation Society
cmg
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 1042


« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2008, 03:13:00 PM »

A bit of a gross generalisation.

I detest it on a cellular basis.

Thal

CORRECTION:  Not everyone admires this concerto.  Thal has spoken.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Current repertoire:  "Come to Jesus" (in whole-notes)
kitty on the keys
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 390


« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2008, 03:30:02 PM »

A GREAT concerto!!!!!  I like the Beethoven cadenza. It's worth all the hard work!

Kitty on the keys
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Kitty on the Keys
James Lee
mikey6
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 1403


« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2008, 03:12:48 PM »

Tis my least fav of the 5 too.
You've heard the cadenza?  Or you've heard it called perfunctory?  If you liek the Beethoven, play it! We can't decide for you.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Never look at the trombones. You'll only encourage them.
Richard Strauss
franzliszt2
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 1003


« Reply #8 on: September 08, 2008, 03:56:37 PM »

This and the 4th are my 2 favourite Beethoven concerto's. I played the Beethoven cadenza. I think it is an amzing cadenza.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  


Need more info or help?


Search pianostreet.com - the web's largest resource of information about piano playing:



 
Jump to:  


Most popular classical piano composers:
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

o