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In recent months, the 85-year-old Ukrainian composer Valentin Silvestrov has received the world's attention more than ever due to the ongoing war. Silvestrov's piano music covers more than half a century, and it would be hard to find a better proponent for it than the composer's longtime friend Boris Berman, whose coming album offers a panorama of the composer's evolution. Berman has also just released a new Brahms album – and feels an affinity between the two composers. Read more >>

Topic: Will I be able to play this piece?  (Read 1982 times)

Offline pseudopianist

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Will I be able to play this piece?
on: May 25, 2004, 09:51:09 PM
Hello I'm your newest n00b. :p

I've been playing classical piano for about a year and practise about 3 - 4 hours per day or more. I'm originally a guitarist but after 5 years of playing I quit. :)

I'm taking lessons from a great pianist (which my school pays for cause I studying music at the school. :p)

and during this year I've learnt the following pieces

Chopin - Prelude in E minor Op28
Bach - Gavotte (From the 5th french suite)
Mozarts Fantasy in D minor
And Chopins Nocturne in E flat.
I'm currently working on Chopins Raindrop Prelude.
My teacher thinks I've turned from a hopeless case to a great pianist who really seems to have the patience and love for the piano that is needed. :)

Well now to the question:

As you might have noticed I'm huge Chopin fan and to learn his etude in A flat would really be a dream come to true. ;) Would it be possible for me? I'm willing to spend time on it.

How hard is this piece anyway?

I'm rather fast in my fingers so I don't think that will be a problem.

Thanks for your time and Yes, I know I've spelled my username incorrectly. :)

/Pär Stenberg
Whisky and Messiaen

Offline Dave_2004_G

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Re: Will I be able to play this piece?
Reply #1 on: May 25, 2004, 11:35:43 PM
Hi and welcome!

From what you said, I couldn't really tell exactly what piece you meant - I think there is more than one etude in a flat?  Do you mean op25 no 1?

I think you'd be best to ask your teacher, he/she's the only one who's gunna be able to give you an adequate answer - but my 2cents is that it's a big leap from pieces like the raindrop prelude to any of the etudes

Dave

Offline donjuan

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Re: Will I be able to play this piece?
Reply #2 on: May 26, 2004, 12:41:57 AM
The aeolian harp etude is a beautiful piece.  I hope that is the one you are referring to...Op.25 No.1.??

Almost all of my teacher's students play it, so I guess it isnt too difficult..
The main thing is to bring the melody across first, and not play with fingers, but the whole hand, elbow, and torso.
Judging by the pieces you have done, I think you will find the style of performance different.  whether or not it is difficult is a matter of opinion.  Personally, I would attempt one of the easier works of Liszt to get used to the virtuosic, charming style.
donjuan  

Offline sharon_f

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Re: Will I be able to play this piece?
Reply #3 on: May 26, 2004, 01:31:17 AM
I agree with Dave. It is a big jump (actually more a huge leap) from the Raindrop to any of the Etudes.

Why don't you work on some of the Chopin Waltzes first.
They are excellent "stepping stones" to the more difficult works of Chopin. They will introduce you to some of the same techniques used in the etudes, wrist and arm rotation, jumps and stretches in the left hand. Fast fingers alone will not be enough.

Talk to your teacher. Let him/her know that your goal is to eventually play that specific etude. A good teacher will be able to give you pieces that will progressively build your technique, so that not only will you eventually be able to play the etude, more importantly, you will be able to play it beautifully.
There are two means of refuge from the misery of life - music and cats.
Albert Schweitzer

Offline pseudopianist

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Re: Will I be able to play this piece?
Reply #4 on: May 27, 2004, 06:54:05 PM
Yeah I meant the Op25 etude.

I'm aware of the huge leap from Raindrop to the etude but then agian I don't find any of the other piece challanging at all. I already know the first 3 bars of the Ab etude up to speed but I've noticed it becomes rather challing after a while... Oh well.

Thanks for your replys.
Whisky and Messiaen

Offline trunks

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Re: Will I be able to play this piece?
Reply #5 on: May 27, 2004, 09:25:19 PM
Quote
I'm aware of the huge leap from Raindrop to the etude but then agian I don't find any of the other piece challanging at all. I already know the first 3 bars of the Ab etude up to speed but I've noticed it becomes rather challing after a while... Oh well.

Wow . . . not challenging at all - I envy you! Try the A minor Winter Wind Op.25 No.11, or the Thirds Op.25 No.6, or No.1, 2, 4 from Op.10. Try also the Sonatas, Ballades and Scherzos. Or Preludes Op.28 No.8, 10, 16, 18, 19, 24 ?
Peter (Hong Kong)
part-time piano tutor
amateur classical concert pianist

Offline pseudopianist

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Re: Will I be able to play this piece?
Reply #6 on: May 27, 2004, 09:28:15 PM
Quote

Wow . . . not challenging at all - I envy you! Try the A minor Winter Wind Op.25 No.11, or the Thirds Op.25 No.6, or No.1, 2, 4 from Op.10. Try also the Sonatas, Ballades and Scherzos. Or Preludes Op.28 No.8, 10, 16, 18, 19, 24 ?


;)
Not really challanging at all (Don't take me too serious)  ;D  I should have added a smilie to that part.

The one I find the most challenging would be the last page of the Eb nocturne.
Whisky and Messiaen

Offline donjuan

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Re: Will I be able to play this piece?
Reply #7 on: May 28, 2004, 01:17:48 AM
I think you should play works of Liszt first before attempting the Op25 etude.  Liszt, after all, helped Chopin compose the works.  Why dont you play "Un Sospiro"- it is similar in tone to the Aflat Etude, and will get you ready for the arpeggios that wreak hell on many students..
donjuan

Offline pseudopianist

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Re: Will I be able to play this piece?
Reply #8 on: May 28, 2004, 12:44:34 PM
Quote
I think you should play works of Liszt first before attempting the Op25 etude.  Liszt, after all, helped Chopin compose the works.  Why dont you play "Un Sospiro"- it is similar in tone to the Aflat Etude, and will get you ready for the arpeggios that wreak hell on many students..
donjuan


I will check what you recomended. Thanks. :)
Whisky and Messiaen
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