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Chopin nocturnes (Read 3960 times)

Offline grisell

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Chopin nocturnes
« on: October 26, 2008, 06:07:13 PM »
I would like comments on these:



piano sheet music of Nocturne


Offline thalbergmad

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Re: Chopin nocturnes
«Reply #1 on: October 26, 2008, 07:19:59 PM »
My speakers are not working at the moment, so i cannot comment on the music.

I would however say that i have never in my life seen anyone sit so high. You are asking for back problems.

Thal
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Offline healdie

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Re: Chopin nocturnes
«Reply #2 on: October 26, 2008, 07:40:22 PM »
I agree with Thal (saying this alot latley) you are sitting very high

the music to me sounds very safe you don't seem to be pushing any boundries expressivly or otherwise, so personally i would prefer a more coulerful performance
but i did not notice any wrong note so technically it sounded fine, it just seemed to lack detail

may ask what you used the headphones for?
"Talent is hitting a target no one else can hit, Genius is hitting a target no one else can see"

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Offline grisell

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Re: Chopin nocturnes
«Reply #3 on: October 26, 2008, 09:07:05 PM »
Yes, I'm sitting very high. Always did that. Any comments on the second one?



I'm of course grateful for all comments, especially technically.

Offline grisell

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Re: Chopin nocturnes
«Reply #4 on: October 26, 2008, 09:12:49 PM »
The earphones are there because I.m running my video camera on an external mic directly from the piano. Otherwise I wouldn't be heraing what I'm playing.

Offline xxmynameisjohnxx

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Re: Chopin nocturnes
«Reply #5 on: October 27, 2008, 12:37:00 AM »
Technically you performed quite well.  Since I'm not quite at the level of playing Nocturnes, I can't give many tips there to improve.  But, I would suggest adding more feeling and dynamics.  Of course feeling and dynamics are hard on digital pianos, but in chopin...the more the merrier.
Currently working on
Chopin: Waltz 34/2 in Am [polishing]
Debussy: Clair De Lune [paused currently]
Mozart: Sonata 5 K283 in G 1st movement [polishing]
Bach: Sinfonia 4 in Dm [halfway through]

Offline pianisten1989

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Re: Chopin nocturnes
«Reply #6 on: October 28, 2008, 10:28:42 AM »
It's kind of unintresting... No rubato, and almost the same dynamic all the time. And you really have to sit lower, or you will kill yourself

Offline timmyb

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Re: Chopin nocturnes
«Reply #7 on: October 28, 2008, 09:31:38 PM »
You've made a good start with these two, all the notes appear to be correct and you've got a nice touch.One general critism I would make is that the left hand is too loud.
For a more Chopinesque feel to the phrasing, dynamics and rubato I'd recommend repeated listening to all his works by great Chopin pianists like Rubinstein or Pollini until the correct style becomes second nature.
Also, as other people have said, that seat is way too high.

Offline rachfan

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Re: Chopin nocturnes
«Reply #8 on: October 28, 2008, 11:28:58 PM »
Hi grisell,

I was amazed to see you "sitting" in almost a standing position!  Ergonomically, your thighs and forearms should actually be fairly parallel to the floor with wrists neutrally extended from the arms.  Right now, your arms are slanted straight downward from the shoulders at about a 75 degree angle, and your wrists are, consequently, forced to flex your hands unnaturally upward, almost forming an the profile of an L.  Instead, your forearms should be forming nearly a 90 degree angle at the elbow with your upper arms, with wrists neutrally extended from the forearms. Your positioning is virtually an invitation to carpal tunnel syndrome or tendonitis.  The other thing, apart from this quiet nocturne, is that if you play a piece with heavy chords, you'll not have the natural weight of the arms through gravity to assist you in achieving the richest possible tone.  I see above where you lightly pass off these observations concerning you're posture at the piano as being irrelevant and not worthy of note; but I believe that those who are commenting on it (like me) are truly concerned for your well-being in playing the piano.
Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities.

Offline j.s. bach the 534th

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Re: Chopin nocturnes
«Reply #9 on: October 28, 2008, 11:43:47 PM »
Yes, I'm sitting very high. Always did that. Any comments on the second one?



I'm of course grateful for all comments, especially technically.

well, I certainly like the second one better than the first one. The first one really doesn't have any emotion in it. The second one is a little better. Technically, though, nice job on both.

Offline thierry13

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Re: Chopin nocturnes
«Reply #10 on: October 29, 2008, 02:53:25 AM »
Yes, I'm sitting very high. Always did that.
The source of all your problems.

I'm of course grateful for all comments, especially technically.
You answered your own question.

Offline sarrasani

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Re: Chopin nocturnes
«Reply #11 on: November 02, 2008, 01:19:13 AM »
I would like comments on these:




Good work.
But, for my modest opinion:
1) there is no rubato and very few dynamic nuances. The similarity with the "belcanto" (Chopin reference here and not only here) is very difficult without
microdynamics and tempo fluctuations.
2) the sound of l.h. is too much similar to r.h one
3) sitting so high can be a problem for wrists, and I think this position can be problematic to give body (especially arms and shoulder) weight to the keys.
All the best for you,
Sandro

Offline grisell

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Re: Chopin nocturnes
«Reply #12 on: November 04, 2008, 12:47:26 AM »
Thank you all for your very kind comments!

I will try to sit lower even though it feels awkward.

I learned to play the piano almost completely by myself, and haven't had any professional comments for 20 years, so I am very grateful for all assistance and any hints I can get.

Please remember that the dynamics of my digital piano is very limited. The advantage with a digtal one is that I can sit up at night and play without disturbing my neighbors.

I have posted some new video clips on this forum, so if would comment on those, I would be very happy.

Thanks in advance

Offline gyzzzmo

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Re: Chopin nocturnes
«Reply #13 on: November 04, 2008, 08:11:08 AM »
At least this piece is TECHNICALLY more of your level, but you need proper guidance on how you should play. So please get yourself a good teacher, he/she can get your playing to a much better level in a short time. It would be very much worth the money ;)

good luck,

gyzzzmo
1+1=11

Offline chozartmaninoff

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Re: Chopin nocturnes
«Reply #14 on: November 09, 2008, 06:21:20 PM »
sounds fairly good, i would say your deffinatly sitting too high. But technically the piece was well played, try recording on a better quality piano. Can make alot of difference. :)

Offline rhapsody4

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Re: Chopin nocturnes
«Reply #15 on: November 09, 2008, 08:09:03 PM »
Can only add to the above regarding the height at which you are sitting at the keyboard. It really is going to limit any musical expression and individuality which you wish to show performing any of these pieces. Even with a sound technique, it is going to make your playing sound very bland and possibly do you physical damage to your wrists.

Regarding other pieces you posted, I would advise you to stick at pieces more around this level and develop a little slower. By going straight for the big pieces, it is going to limit your repertoire and also reduce your skill level by not developing simple technique to a good enough standard to have a proper attempt at the more virtuosic works. I don't mean this to sound too harsh, but there seems little point in saying that it is all perfect.

Good luck.
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Offline lostinidlewonder

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Re: Chopin nocturnes
«Reply #16 on: November 10, 2008, 12:39:06 AM »
Well I don't think that the height at which he sits is "normal" (Arms parallel to the ground) but we can't say that it is wrong. I have seen many great pianists playing in ways which defy the norm. That is not to say that people should aim to do it, if that is what you do, that is what you do, so long you feel comfortable and have tried the alternatives.

When you play high, lifting the hand to use the weight of the hand to play notes starts looking different. It starts to actually look like one plays with individual finger movements where in fact they are supported by the downward force of the entire arm. So if you attempt to make your arm position more parallel to the ground you will find lifting your hand very different and it might pose some challenges.

The challenges that arise from playing high is being able to play a large string of notes and make it feel like one motion of the hand. You can often break it up into too many parts because your hand feels like it is dropping into pattens throughout the patterns.

The digital you are playing on doesn't sound very nice (compared to a concert grand for instance, it reminded me of listening to telephone waiting music ;) )  and it can do no service to the beauty of Chopin Nocturnes. So that's why you might get some people saying the expression is lacking. It is hard to squeeze out note qualities and phrase legato ties beautifully out of electricity sometimes.

In terms of using Rubato in Chopin it is generally of good taste to maintain a steady melody over a stolen time in the support. Which notes can be held back slightly, we should always question it in the support and certainly when it is tasteful now and then to do it in the melodic lines.
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