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Topic: Ligeti etudes  (Read 1906 times)

Offline liszmaninopin

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Ligeti etudes
on: May 30, 2004, 06:59:20 PM
If any of you have ever played any of Ligeti's etudes, did you find them rewarding pieces to work on?  How do you think they'd go over in recital or competition if played well?

Offline Alp635

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Re: Ligeti etudes
Reply #1 on: May 31, 2004, 08:08:42 AM
Ligeti etudes...

They are amazing pieces and very much in vogue right now.  I have not worked on them but everyone around me seems to be working on a set...all I know is that they are excrutiatingly hard to learn...the hards ones are really tought but in a competition they light up the audience generating a tremendous "WOW".  

Fanfares is probably the most mangeable one, but there is a great one that descends chromatically...not sure which one it is.

Offline Hmoll

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Re: Ligeti etudes
Reply #2 on: May 31, 2004, 05:09:05 PM
They are prety difficult.
I love listening to them, but they are not very original. The first book is by far better than the second.
If you're looking for pieces where a composer breaks new ground, look elsewhere. Just about eveything in the etudes Ligeti has done before.
Great competition pieces. Audiences love them. One was actually commissioned for a big competition. Can't remember which etude or which competition, though.
"I am sitting in the smallest room of my house. I have your review before me. In a moment it will be behind me!" -- Max Reger

Offline Hmoll

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Re: Ligeti etudes
Reply #3 on: May 31, 2004, 05:11:40 PM
Quote
Ligeti etudes...

there is a great one that descends chromatically...not sure which one it is.


Sounds like "Autumn in Warsaw."
"I am sitting in the smallest room of my house. I have your review before me. In a moment it will be behind me!" -- Max Reger

Offline liszmaninopin

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Re: Ligeti etudes
Reply #4 on: May 31, 2004, 06:13:19 PM
I'm not necessarily looking for pieces that break new ground, I was thinking more in terms of etudes that both develop technique and would be good to use in competitions.  It sounds like these etudes might meet those requirements.  I suppose, then, that you would recommend I purchase book one of the etudes instead of book two?  I can try book one out first.

Offline Hmoll

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Re: Ligeti etudes
Reply #5 on: June 02, 2004, 12:05:24 AM
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I'm not necessarily looking for pieces that break new ground, I was thinking more in terms of etudes that both develop technique and would be good to use in competitions.  It sounds like these etudes might meet those requirements.  I suppose, then, that you would recommend I purchase book one of the etudes instead of book two?  I can try book one out first.


Autumn in Warsaw is pretty popular, and I think it is in Book 1. There are a couple popular ones in book 2. Look at both books. I like the etudes in both. The ones in book one are better compositions, IMO.
"I am sitting in the smallest room of my house. I have your review before me. In a moment it will be behind me!" -- Max Reger
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