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Topic: Memorization  (Read 2245 times)

Offline Allan

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Memorization
on: June 04, 2004, 09:56:51 AM
How do you memorize a piano piece?  For me, I rely to an extant on my photographic memory.  I can visualize the music on the paper (which is why I do not like to change editions once I have learned a piece).  People, of course, have naturally different ways of memorizing and learning.  If I am at a party and many names are mentioned I will usually forget the names quickly.  However, if people are wearing name tags I can remember their names for a long time.  The topic of how the mind works is a fascinating one!    The contrapunal music of Bach is, of course, a real challenge to memorize (and a great thrill when you do).  (Some might be interested to look at the great American organist Virgil Fox's webpage, www.virgilfoxlegacy.com, click on under "chronology" and you will find some video clips of his playing.  He used to perform a two hour "Bach Gamut" concert  with memorized performances of Bach's magnificent organ works...whew!).

Offline amanfang

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Re: Memorization
Reply #1 on: June 04, 2004, 11:01:07 PM
I don't think for the most part that there is any "one" way that any of us memorize.  It's a combination of many things.  Some is by study and analysis of the score.  Muscle memory plays a big part, as does aural memory.  Being strong in several areas will best help the memory of the piece.  
When you earnestly believe you can compensate for a lack of skill by doubling your efforts, there's no end to what you can't do.

f0bul0us

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Re: Memorization
Reply #2 on: June 05, 2004, 12:19:08 AM

Offline bernhard

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Re: Memorization
Reply #3 on: June 05, 2004, 12:26:51 AM
I cannot remember! ;D

(Couldn't resist ;))

It means Frequently Asked Questions.
The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side. (Hunter Thompson)

Offline Motrax

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Re: Memorization
Reply #4 on: June 05, 2004, 01:00:12 AM
Is that your shortest post, Bernhard?  :)
"I always make sure that the lid over the keyboard is open before I start to play." --  Artur Schnabel, after being asked for the secret of piano playing.

Offline Antnee

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Re: Memorization
Reply #5 on: June 06, 2004, 03:30:53 AM
Yeah...

Do you guys find it easier to sight read and memorize by reading through it over and over or to memorize by simply reading the music and memorizing it one bar at a time?? And then do you try to memorize the whole piece before playing it and seriously practicing it, or memorize lits bits at a time and get those parts up to speed before moemorizing further? What do you guys do??
"The trouble with music appreciation in general is that people are taught to have too much respect for music they should be taught to love it instead." -  Stravinsky

Offline jennbo

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Re: Memorization
Reply #6 on: June 06, 2004, 09:10:14 PM
i play it 10 times a day.
haha and it  usually sticks after a day or two.
also, my evil nazi teacher [who happens to be fab] makes me repeat section by section until it's supremo [which never is] so i end up practicing my sucky part [which'd be the whole piece] loads of time and usually it sticks.

Offline goansongo

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Re: Memorization
Reply #7 on: June 10, 2004, 11:20:56 AM
I used to have the problem with memorizing a piece as well.  You just need to listen to the song more, and play it even more.  Once you get to the point where you can play a song relaxed, not focused on which notes to push, you know you've memorized it.  
Memorizing a song doesn't necessarily mean you don't have to look at the notes.  If you can play a song without looking at the notes, but you're very focused on which notes to push, you're only at the beginning of memorizing the piece.  You need to learn the notes, then forget the notes and let the music guide you.  If you don't believe me, try playing "Jingle Bells" or something easy.  Chances are, you'll have no trouble memorizing it because you know the song so well and the music just flows through your fingers so you can listen to the music, and not be distracted by the correct notes to push.
 

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