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Topic: Gershwin  (Read 3229 times)

Offline goalevan

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Gershwin
on: June 06, 2004, 03:08:14 AM
I think his music is incredible - Concerto in F, Rhapsody in Blue, the preludes, Swanee, I Got Rhythm, Sweet and Low Down. I love it all, but wonder why I never see his name come up on the forums.

Offline faulty_damper

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Re: Gershwin
Reply #1 on: June 06, 2004, 09:20:40 AM
Because he's not considered a classical composer who did anything new.

Consider most of his works and the thing they have in common is this: they all sound a like!

Some originality would have been nice but he didn't do that.  It was all the same.  The only reason Rhapsody in Blue is popular is because of the name, Rhapsody in Blue.  It has a ring to it, like Chopin's Fantasy Impromptu - it's not that great of a piece but the title is catchy.  Also, Gershwin's Concerto in F:  doesn't it sound like Rhapsody in Blue?  Et Vice Versa?

I don't really like Gershwin.  He's like a one-hit wonder that gets replicated in all of his works.

Offline cziffra

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Re: Gershwin
Reply #2 on: June 06, 2004, 06:10:26 PM
Where's ed when you need him?
What it all comes down to is that one does not play the piano with one’s fingers; one plays the piano with one’s mind.-  Glenn Gould

Offline goalevan

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Re: Gershwin
Reply #3 on: June 06, 2004, 10:47:45 PM
I don't think they sound anything alike, maybe the fact that they have more of a jazz sound, other then that I don't know what you mean at all.

Offline cziffra

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Re: Gershwin
Reply #4 on: June 07, 2004, 11:48:01 AM
don't worry, goalevan, he's trying his hardest to have an opinion but he just hasn't figured out how to do that quite yet.  i wouldn't be bothered by him.
What it all comes down to is that one does not play the piano with one’s fingers; one plays the piano with one’s mind.-  Glenn Gould

Offline faulty_damper

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Re: Gershwin
Reply #5 on: June 07, 2004, 12:49:56 PM
don't worry, goalevan, he's trying his hardest to have an opinion but he just hasn't figured out how to do that quite yet.  i wouldn't be bothered by him.

Offline edouard

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Re: Gershwin
Reply #6 on: June 07, 2004, 02:37:39 PM
my fave piece by him is the first prelude from a series of three. its definitely on my 'to do' list for this summer. it would be nice and light for an encore! anyone play this one?

-e

Offline Chopins_Fantaisie

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Re: Gershwin
Reply #7 on: June 09, 2004, 02:47:05 AM
Quote
my fave piece by him is the first prelude from a series of three. its definitely on my 'to do' list for this summer. it would be nice and light for an encore! anyone play this one?

-e


that would be a great one for an encore, i think.  :) I've played it (not for encore, but for learning and enjoying it)
Music is my refuge. I could crawl into the spaces between the notes and curl my back to loneliness. - Maya Angelou

Offline Bob

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Re: Gershwin
Reply #8 on: June 09, 2004, 07:17:11 AM
The Preludes are fun -- harder than they sound though.

Don't you find when you listen to a new style, it all sounds the same for awhile?

Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."

Offline edouard

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Re: Gershwin
Reply #9 on: June 09, 2004, 06:01:44 PM
quote: that would be a great one for an encore, i think.   I've played it (not for encore, but for learning and enjoying it)

Hi,
could you tell which edition you would recommend for it, because i am totally new to Gerschwin as far as playing goes so i dont have any of his music.
thanks
ed

Offline Chopins_Fantaisie

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Re: Gershwin
Reply #10 on: June 10, 2004, 03:21:16 AM
Edouard,

the edition I have is a Warner Bros. Publications. It's a book that's just the three preludes. That's the only copy of Gershwin's Preludes that I've seen....
Music is my refuge. I could crawl into the spaces between the notes and curl my back to loneliness. - Maya Angelou

Offline goansongo

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Re: Gershwin
Reply #11 on: June 10, 2004, 04:41:20 AM
I would consider Gershwin more of a Jazz pianist than a classical pianist.  Perhaps he's a mixture of both.  Not many people have heard his ragtime piano songs either.   If you can, you should check out
Grieving for You
Make Believe
Land Where the Good Songs Go
Some Sunday Morning
Those are some very unpopular pieces by Gershwin and I can't seem to find the score anyway!  Furthermore, I can't even find any information about these songs.  I just have a cd with a few of his songs and they were on there.  

Offline Bob

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Re: Gershwin
Reply #12 on: June 10, 2004, 07:09:59 AM
I used the Warner Bros. edition.  I found another one later on (probably Schirmer or Alfred... I can't find it now.)  It was edited and had other preludes.  I think there either 5 or 7 of them.  Maybe someone should ask Bernhard?

Speaking of the preludes... I have a CD of Gerswhin's radio interviews (Gershin Plays Gershwin I think it's called).  He plays the second prelude faster than anyone else I've heard.  It sounds almost like a march.  The radio shows from that series were only 15 minutes, so he may have been pushing the tempo for time (although it seems odd a composer would play an entire composition of their own faster just to sqeeze it into a radio show for time).  And!... It's very dry.  Very little pedal.  Everyone else I've heard playing it takes it slow and smooth.  However, this is a recording of the composer.  I think it's even mentioned in the liner notes that he thought everyone played the second prelude too fast with too much pedal.  Any thoughts?  (Another possibility is that Gershwin was just improvising with the second prelude...)
Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."

Offline edouard

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Re: Gershwin
Reply #13 on: June 10, 2004, 03:12:51 PM
cheers, bob
i'll check out the editions in my local music store to see what they have!
e

Offline bernhard

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Re: Gershwin
Reply #14 on: June 10, 2004, 10:52:15 PM
Quote
I used the Warner Bros. edition.  I found another one later on (probably Schirmer or Alfred... I can't find it now.)  It was edited and had other preludes.  I think there either 5 or 7 of them.  Maybe someone should ask Bernhard?


The preludes were written between 1923 and 1926. When he first played them in public there were five of them, and he had sketches for more. He intended to put them all together into a series called “The Melting Pot”. However this never came out to pass. Instead only three preludes were ever published (and dedicated to composer William Daly). The original edition is by New World Music:

I.      Allegro ben ritmato e preciso – Gershwin called this prelude “Spanish”. This is a fast virtuoso piece, very good as an encore.

II.      Andante con moto e poco rubato. Gershwin called this prelude a “blues lullaby”. Slow and slightly lugubrious, it would make quite a good piece to play before an intermission.

III.      Allegro ben ritmato e preciso – This is my favourite of the three (and the most difficult).

You can play them as a set or isolately. They are not that difficult – about grade 7/8.

Quote
Speaking of the preludes... I have a CD of Gerswhin's radio interviews (Gershin Plays Gershwin I think it's called).  He plays the second prelude faster than anyone else I've heard.  It sounds almost like a march.  The radio shows from that series were only 15 minutes, so he may have been pushing the tempo for time (although it seems odd a composer would play an entire composition of their own faster just to sqeeze it into a radio show for time).  And!... It's very dry.  Very little pedal.  Everyone else I've heard playing it takes it slow and smooth.  However, this is a recording of the composer.  I think it's even mentioned in the liner notes that he thought everyone played the second prelude too fast with too much pedal.  Any thoughts?  (Another possibility is that Gershwin was just improvising with the second prelude...)


This is very interesting. Do you know which is the label on this CD?

Best wishes,
Bernhard.
The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side. (Hunter Thompson)

Offline rubleski

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Re: Gershwin
Reply #15 on: June 13, 2004, 03:10:49 AM
The only pieces I've played of Gerswhin are the 3 Preludes and Rhapsody in Blue, i love them both.
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