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Topic: Strange thing...  (Read 1809 times)

Offline Antnee

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Strange thing...
on: June 07, 2004, 01:59:46 AM
Why is it that whenever I pick up a new piece I can play it unbelievably well (except for some parts) in terms of dynamics, accuracy, and sometimes speed but over the next few days with this piece, these things seem to get nasty sounding and sloppy so I then slow down to prevent any bad habits, and then a couple of weeks later, It's back to the way it was before and a few weeks after that it sounds even better. Anybody else experience this? The little slump in the middle? Why does this happen?

-Tony-
"The trouble with music appreciation in general is that people are taught to have too much respect for music they should be taught to love it instead." -  Stravinsky

JK

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Re: Strange thing...
Reply #1 on: June 07, 2004, 02:07:03 AM
I know exactly what you mean!! :D But I don't know for sure why it happens, maybe it has something to do with actually getting the piece clear in your head, when you first play it you are simply reacting to what you see but chances are if you were asked specific questions about a part of the piece then you wouldn't remember. Maybe in this period your brain is getting used to all the new information and just sorting out! I combat this by only playing a new piece through a couple of times to start with, then I launch straight into slow practice, this stops me going into to this temporary lull.

Offline willcowskitz

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Re: Strange thing...
Reply #2 on: June 07, 2004, 02:17:30 AM
When you start with it, possibly highly motivated, you put everything into it you got. This might turn into overconfidence/carelessness towards the physical performance as you keep playing. I have the same problem with computer games; when I start playing something that requires good reflexes and skill, I progress very quickly and then I reach some kind of a treshold where I'm back to average, from there I need to push myself back up again, which was so easy and trivial of a task the first time. It could also be that you start perceiving your playing in more detail and find the real nature of it, or, your mind becomes dull to the piece - you lose the required attention it craves and which you enthusiastically (...?) gave it when you first started with it.  Just speaking from own experience.  :P

Offline Bob

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Re: Strange thing...
Reply #3 on: June 13, 2004, 05:40:18 AM
Could it be you lose the sense of "oneness" of the piece?  The first time you play, you have a concept of everything being one fabric of music.  After the piece settles in your mind, maybe you start splitting it up, focusing on individual details?

It could also be that your attention is taking up by playing the piece that you don't notice all the details the first time you play.  After your mind is freed up, you start hearing that you're not actually playing what you thought you were?

What do you think?
Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."

Offline Antnee

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Re: Strange thing...
Reply #4 on: June 13, 2004, 05:44:43 AM
Quote
It could also be that your attention is taking up by playing the piece that you don't notice all the details the first time you play.  After your mind is freed up, you start hearing that you're not actually playing what you thought you were?


I have been considering that possibility and I think that is exactly what it is...
It'a like after playing it for awhile you start to hear what you are missing...

-Tony-
"The trouble with music appreciation in general is that people are taught to have too much respect for music they should be taught to love it instead." -  Stravinsky

Offline bitus

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Re: Strange thing...
Reply #5 on: June 13, 2004, 06:32:04 AM
Try recording yourself... you have the impression that you are playing it perfect and beautifull ;) But when you listen to the recording, youl see that you are emoting very much and playing very superficialy. Been there, did that... Any piece needs to be digested by your hand and mind, and needs to settle, needs depth. It's like a beautifl woman... you think you are in love with her, and you act like it, but it will take you months (years?) to really know her and trully love her.
De Bitus.
Be still, my soul: thy God doth undertake
To guide the future, as He has the past.

Offline bizgirl

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Re: Strange thing...
Reply #6 on: June 18, 2004, 03:46:18 AM
I think it is has to do with what one demands of oneself.  When I play a piece for the first time I have few demands for myself.  I expect to be able to play through it, but I don't expect all correct notes, perfect rhythm, dynamics, etc. the first time I play it so I don't beat myself up over mistakes.  I strive to have all of these things, but I don't demand them.  I am much harder on myself the second (and third and fourth and... ) times I play a piece.

Offline Bob

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Re: Strange thing...
Reply #7 on: June 18, 2004, 10:54:06 PM
When it comes time to perform the piece, I do think it's a good idea to get back into that state of mind where you enjoy it and aren't hearing mistakes.  

Ideally, I think a performer needs to get the audience into that state, too -- where the audience is into the piece and not hearing your mistakes.

Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."
 

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