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Author Topic: Speaking of Scriabin etudes...whoa  (Read 2374 times)
nanabush
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« on: March 06, 2010, 04:38:07 PM »

After checking through the Op 45 #5 for a previous thread, I was looking through a few others.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9vMvdVqu-8Y
Here's Op 8 #7.  Listen to the first bit.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlu2z2gkhhI
Now here's "Cohen's Masterpiece" from the game Bioshock for the Xbox.  At 0:12 is where I'm suspicious.




Do they not sound identical (other than the speed difference).  I've just heard the Scriabin for the first time, but I played Bioshock when it came out a few years back... the first thing that came into my mind when I heard the Scriabin (today) was "holy crap, that's a rip off from Bioshock"... then I was like wait a second... this was written a LONG time before.


Just listen, and tell me if that is just a coincidence, or if the guy who wrote that thing for the game could have ripped some material off from this etude  Wink
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retrouvailles
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« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2010, 05:23:20 PM »

This really doesn't come as a surprise to me, for most game composers have studied orchestral music (and piano music) while learning their trade. Just like film composers, they may rip off the odd piece and use it as their own. It does sound pretty close for it to be not a coincidence to me.
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