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Author Topic: Bach Invention nr 1 for two part  (Read 6728 times)
rmbarbosa
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« on: April 04, 2010, 03:45:01 PM »

I like to play the Inventions for two part and I play all of them. But yesterday, when I was in the forum, I saw some posts about Invention nr 1 where the mordent, at the first bar, was suposed to be played b-c-b. And the same at 2º bar (f-G-f). It happens that I learned this Invention with an old edition of Inventions, by Bruno Mugellini (<> year 1900!), where he says:"in the manuscripts we find a mordent, not a inverted mordent, but this is undoubtedlly an error of the writing". I dont kow what were his reasons to say this, but I allways have played b-a-b. Am I wrong? Must I play b-c-b? And why Mugellini wrote "undoubtelly an error". May you help me? Thanks.
Rui
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piano sheet music of Invention
stevebob
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« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2010, 05:57:13 PM »

I reckon that Mugellini used the word "undoubtedly" because he was convinced he's right and other editions are wrong.  Unfortunately, the same can be said for the editors whose own judgments diverge from Mugellini's; each has faith that his scholarship and sources are uniquely authoritative.

In this specific instance, I couldn't say whether a mordent or an inverted mordent is more correct, authentic or appropriate; I've seen it printed both ways, and heard it played both ways.  Though I'm hardly an authority on Bach or Baroque performance practices, it may be helpful to recall that some license was expected of performers in the location and execution of embellishments in music of that era.

If you prefer a mordent, I think you should continue to play it as such.  The editions that prescribe a mordent are undoubtedly (!) as reputable as Mugellini's.
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What passes you ain't for you.
rmbarbosa
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« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2010, 06:58:59 PM »

Thank you, Stevebob, your opinion makes sense. I was so worried ... Cry
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