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Topic: Polonaise in A-flat Major Op.53 - Chopin, new version  (Read 6366 times)

Offline adapa

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I rerecorded this, my youtube version was sloppy and i got good advice from you guys so here we go again! Enjoy and tell me how it sounds :)

Offline rachfan

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Re: Polonaise in A-flat Major Op.53 - Chopin, new version
Reply #1 on: May 25, 2010, 01:21:40 AM
Hi adapta,

I didn't follow your performance with the score, but believe that you have produced a fully creditable rendition of this Polonaise.  You display an ample technique, attend thoughtfully to matters of musicality, and play always with musical intent, spirit and flair.  I enjoyed listening.   
Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities.

Offline birba

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Re: Polonaise in A-flat Major Op.53 - Chopin, new version
Reply #2 on: May 25, 2010, 12:58:42 PM
 I agree.  That was very good!  And it shows how the quality of a piano doesn't necessarily have to affect the rendition of the performance.  I prefer listening to an out-of-tune piano then a synthesizer.  Or whatever it's called.
In the octave section, before the E-flat-major part, a slight rit. in anticipation, and slightly (ever so slightly) slower.  It sounds bigger and more "blown up" that way.

Offline adapa

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Re: Polonaise in A-flat Major Op.53 - Chopin, new version
Reply #3 on: May 27, 2010, 09:51:49 PM
I agree the recording quality isn't good, but it is mainly the piano that make it sound "less" than it should. This was not written to be played on an upright. Thanks for the advice on the octave section, but in terms of interpretation i don't know if that would be announcing too much as i happen to play the following section quite calm. I might experiment a bit though :)
There are so many different ways to play this piece that i cant stick with an interpretation for long before getting curious. I must say i like the Rubinstein and horowitz versions(although they are very different) better than newer, more "rounded edges" interpretations such as rafal blechacz in the chopin competition. But they are all fascinating ways to play this piece.
 

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