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Topic: Good peice to learn  (Read 4808 times)

Offline greyrune

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Good peice to learn
on: July 19, 2004, 04:34:50 AM
was wondering what a good grade 6 classical peice would be.  I'm looking for something kind of dark and moody.  I haven't actually played calssical before, only jazz.  It's funny. it's only since I came to this forum that I really started listenening to classical.  I used to listen to it a little and enjoyed it, but i didn't listen to any piano really.  Love it now though so cheers guys.
I'll be Bach

Offline in_love_with_liszt

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Re: Good peice to learn
Reply #1 on: July 19, 2004, 04:53:54 AM
Quote
was wondering what a good grade 6 classical peice would be.  I'm looking for something kind of dark and moody.  I haven't actually played calssical before, only jazz.  It's funny. it's only since I came to this forum that I really started listenening to classical.  I used to listen to it a little and enjoyed it, but i didn't listen to any piano really.  Love it now though so cheers guys.


hmm....I don't think anyone here has played "calssical" music....(catchy name...maybe "Calssica" would sound better....it sounds like...I dunno like something). Well classical musically speaking...umm I don't really know how the whole level thing goes but it sounds like you mean something of moderate difficulty, no? Look at the Chopin waltzes and nocturnes, Mozart or Beethoven sonatas or Mendelssohn solos like the songs without words. Some of the Bach fuges get close to moderate difficulty, so you could look into those. From what you've been listening to have you found you enjoy Baroque, Classical, Romantic or Contemporary? (oh I guess I should mention impressionism...although some of those pieces are kind of like forefathers of Jazz, and it sounds like you're trying to go for more classical works...).
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Offline rlefebvr

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Re: Good peice to learn
Reply #2 on: July 19, 2004, 05:12:47 AM
You could try Grieg's Melodie #3 Opus 47 from Book 4.

It has a sort of Jazzy style to it and is very dark and moody.

It's about a level 5 or 6 for me anyway for what that's worth.

It's what I am working on now.

Awsomne piece

Ron Lefebvre

 Ron Lefebvre © Copyright. Any reproduction of all or part of this post is sheer stupidity.

Offline shasta

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Re: Good peice to learn
Reply #3 on: July 19, 2004, 11:35:48 PM
I don't know anything about grades, but you may enjoy the following for their dark beauty and/or rhythmic spirit:

Rachmaninov's Corelli Variations (one of my favorites)
Bartok's Romanian Folk Dances
Chopin's etude Op.25 No.7
Muczynski's preludes
Scriabin's preludes
some of the Brahms Intermezzi
Rach's C# prelude
"self is self"   - i_m_robot

Offline bernhard

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Re: Good peice to learn
Reply #4 on: July 20, 2004, 11:26:26 AM
These are all around grade 6 (some a bit above, some a bit below):

J. S. Bach: Prelude and Fugue in Em (Book I). This is one of the most beautiful of the set and also one of the easiest (not easy at all: easiest amongst the 48 ).

Scarlatti: There are several sonatas amongst the 555 that could be described as dark and moody. Try K 69; K 87; K 213
(All of the 555 sonatas are excellent technique acquisition exercises, and all of them are excellent repertory. See this thread for suggestions:

https://www.pianoforum.net/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=repo;action=display;num=1077145772)

Mozart: Fantasia in C minor (K475), arguably the darkest and moodiest of all Mozart’s compositions.

Mendelssohn: Songs Without Words (try Op. 30 no. 1; op. 30 no. 6; op. 53 no. 3; op. 62 no. 3 and op. 85 no. 4)

Schumann: Album for the young Op. 68 has some real gems (try no. 28 and no. 30), also check his Bunte Blatter op. 99 (try no. 2, no. 4, no. 9 and no. 10) and the Albumblatter op. 124 (try no. 8 and no. 14).

Chopin: Preludes Op. 28 no. 2, no. 4 and no. 20 are suitably dark. The easiest nocturne (grade 6) is no. 21 in C minor.

Prokofiev – Have a look here for a lot of easy Prokofiev (reply # 15). Some of them (especially the “Visions fugitives” are dark and moody)

https://www.pianoforum.net/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=stud;action=display;num=1077907916

Sibelius – His ten pieces for piano op. 76 are within your capacity.

Preisner: 10 easy pieces for piano. There are some really beautiful, evocative pieces in the set. I am not sure how dark they are, but they are certainly moody, haunting pieces. (I particularly like no. 1 “A good morning melody”, no. 2 “Meditation”, no. 4 “Talking to myself”, no. 6 “About passing” and no. 10 “ A good night melody”)

Satie: Gymnopedies and also the Gnossienes.

This should get you started.

Best wishes,
Bernhard.


The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side. (Hunter Thompson)

Offline greyrune

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Re: Good peice to learn
Reply #5 on: July 21, 2004, 05:35:46 PM
Excellent, thanks all of you.  I managed to find a score for Mozart's Fantasia in C minor and so far all is going well.  Thanks again.
Gerard
I'll be Bach
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