Piano Forum

Topic: Field nocturne doubt  (Read 2235 times)

Offline stormx

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 396
Field nocturne doubt
on: October 14, 2010, 03:40:21 PM
Hi:

I am starting to learn Field nocturne nš 10 in E minor, and i have the following doubt:

Time signature is 12/8. In the lower staff there are usually 12 eight notes. In some bars, and exactly corresponding with 3 eight notes of the lower staff, there is in the upper staff a "dotted eight followed by a sixteen note" combo. Of course, this is not "mathematically" correct. I suppose it is some kind of notational convention.

How is this supposed to be played?

I know it would help to paste the sheet, but i dont know how to do it.

Thanks

Offline birba

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3725
Re: Field nocturne doubt
Reply #1 on: October 15, 2010, 12:46:14 PM
12/8?!  In my edition it's 6/8.  You aren't talking about no. 11 in Eb major, are you?

Offline birba

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3725
Re: Field nocturne doubt
Reply #2 on: October 15, 2010, 12:49:21 PM
If that's the case, there's nothing strange about it at all.  The dotted -
sorry, I just looked again and there are no dotted 8th notes in the nocturne.  Only dotted 4ths.
What are you talking about?!

Offline stormx

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 396
Re: Field nocturne doubt
Reply #3 on: October 15, 2010, 01:34:20 PM
Birba, it is indeed nš10 in my edition (Peters, revised by Koehler, can be free downloaded from IMSLP). Tempo indicaction is Adagio and time signature is indeed 12/8. First melody notes are E-B-G-D#-E. In bar 6 you can see the problem i described.

Thanks,

Juan

Offline stevebob

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1133
Re: Field nocturne doubt
Reply #4 on: October 15, 2010, 02:19:34 PM
In both the aforementioned Peters edition as well as the one by Liszt published by G. Schirmer (in which it is No. 9 of the set), there's an element to the time signature that hasn't been mentioned here:  at the start of the piece, 4/4 is printed in parentheses between the staves. 

This alternative time signature reflects that while each of the four primary pulses per measure typically is comprised of three eighth notes (i.e., the compound meter of 12/8), it may also on occasion be treated as an ordinary quarter note (and subdivided accordingly).  In the latter case, there would be nothing mathematically incorrect about a rhythmic group like the one mentioned in bar 6.
What passes you ain't for you.

Offline stormx

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 396
Re: Field nocturne doubt
Reply #5 on: October 15, 2010, 02:26:43 PM
Thanks for your answer Steve !!

So ,it is indeed a "kind" of polyrythm. We have 3 notes in LH against 4 in RH (the first three tied). Right?

No so simple... ??? ???

Offline stevebob

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1133
Re: Field nocturne doubt
Reply #6 on: October 15, 2010, 02:34:46 PM
So ,it is indeed a "kind" of polyrythm. We have 3 notes in LH against 4 in RH (the first three tied). Right?

I see an example of that in bar 14.  In bar 6, though, the last beat is notated in simple meter rhythm in both hands.
What passes you ain't for you.
 

Logo light pianostreet.com - the website for classical pianists, piano teachers, students and piano music enthusiasts.

Subscribe for unlimited access

Sign up

Follow us

Piano Street Digicert