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Topic: Another Program to Puruse  (Read 3096 times)

Offline pianistcellist

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Another Program to Puruse
on: December 15, 2010, 01:56:47 AM
I am putting together a recital program and because I always enjoy the interesting, witty, and sometimes rather ridiculous comments from this board I thought it would be fun to submit it. Thanks for looking and for you ideas!

Scarlatti:
Sonata in F minor K. 386
Sonata in C minor K. 11
Sonata in F minor K. 387

Haydn:
Andante and Variations Hob. XVII/6

Liszt:
Transcendental Etude no. 9 Ricordanza

Chopin:
Ballade no. 4 in F minor

Prokofiev:
Sonata no. 7 in B-flat Major

I am looking forward to playing this program. I think it is interesting and fun. The only problem that I can see with it right now is the large amount of F minor. Ideas?

Offline pianistcellist

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Re: Another Program to Puruse
Reply #1 on: May 25, 2011, 01:46:44 AM
I am just at the point of finalizing this. Any comments?

Offline gerryjay

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Re: Another Program to Puruse
Reply #2 on: May 25, 2011, 10:30:23 PM
dear pc,
without any alterations, i'll propose the following order:
chopin
scarlatti
liszt
(intermission)
haydn
prokofiev

two parts of about half an hour each, and massive contrasts to keep your public awake. i really dislike the liszt-chopin sequence, as well as scarlatti-haydn.

a second idea involves a minute change: find an a-flat major sonata by scarlatti and let the c-minor go. then:

scarlatti f-minor sonata A
chopin
scarlatti a-flat major sonata
liszt

(intermission)

scarlatti f minor sonata B
haydn
prokofiev


best regards!





Offline pianistcellist

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Re: Another Program to Puruse
Reply #3 on: May 26, 2011, 12:41:09 AM
Good ideas. Thanks

I am not allowed an intermission (it is a recital for school), but I will be taking a look for an a-flat major Scarlatti. Is there a reason that you don't like the chronology? It seems funny to me to jump back and forth stylistically, but it could work.

Offline gerryjay

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Re: Another Program to Puruse
Reply #4 on: May 26, 2011, 01:16:16 AM
a full-length recital without a break? is some new kind of torture? i mean, normal people will remain focused on what you are doing for - at most - 20 minutes or so.

but i'm guessing on one point: what is the occasion?

a chronological order is the standard, the default, the predictable. most often, also it is the boring, the annoying, the unbearable... basically, i believe in alchemy: some works fit, some don't. chronology is not a decisive issue to me, although i have played tons of recital in chronological order, until l i noticed that my public was not interested in that per se.

basically, then, i think about moods, tempi, durations, and so on. another important feature is novelty: too many horsebattles in a row stink, because this is what horses do. anyway, there is no precise rule: i like to try anything, record, listen, retry, rerecord, und so weiter...

an important exception is the genre-thematic recital. if you have three sonatas, for instance bach, schubert and shostakovich, well, then it is a great idea to proceed in order. your public will have the oportunity to feel history, especially if you don't mind to comment and create a background to each work.

finally, a great exception is when the chronological order simply works. then, why not? nevertheless, it is not the case of your selection, i'm sorry to say.

best regards!

Offline ramseytheii

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Re: Another Program to Puruse
Reply #5 on: May 26, 2011, 03:26:45 AM
I am putting together a recital program and because I always enjoy the interesting, witty, and sometimes rather ridiculous comments from this board I thought it would be fun to submit it. Thanks for looking and for you ideas!

Scarlatti:
Sonata in F minor K. 386
Sonata in C minor K. 11
Sonata in F minor K. 387

Haydn:
Andante and Variations Hob. XVII/6

Liszt:
Transcendental Etude no. 9 Ricordanza

Chopin:
Ballade no. 4 in F minor

Prokofiev:
Sonata no. 7 in B-flat Major

I am looking forward to playing this program. I think it is interesting and fun. The only problem that I can see with it right now is the large amount of F minor. Ideas?


You know I really don't like this.  The reason is, when the audience leaves, what do you want them to take away?  If you follow the Chopin Ballade with the Prokofiev 7th sonata, a choice that just baffles the mind (do not ever become an interior decorator) you will completely obliterate the memory of the Chopin.

As another poster said, the second part, with the Liszt, Chopin prokofiev, is just one big piece after another.  There's no context, no rest, no reason why they should remember one more importantly than any other.  A good program has focal points, that focuses the mind of the audience and leaves them with a strong impression.  This is just a mixed bag.

Also the way you put Scarlatti and Haydn seems to just get the "Classical" part out of the way.  Dealing with this program, there's not necessarily a good way to order it.  My best suggestion is learn another set of pieces.  My second best suggestion is: Scarlatti; Liszt; Chopin; INTERMISSION; Haydn; Prokofiev.  That may be my second best, but it's a damn good one.

You asked!

Walter Ramsey


 

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