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Talk of the Town: Bavouzet´s Debussy Complete

Jean-Efflam Bavouzet took the Instrumental Award at this year’s BBC Music Awards for the third (out of four) volume of his complete Debussy piano music series on the Chandos label. Read more >>

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Author Topic: a Chopin Recital  (Read 9419 times)
frank_48
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« on: January 09, 2011, 02:06:37 PM »

i am thinking of a hiring a venue for a chopin recital at the end of the year, i was thinking to be worth it, i would play about 20 pieces, going for roughly 90 mins these are the pieces i was hoping to play, i know the first 10 already, so its only a matter of learning the last 10 pieces in a matter of 11 months, what do you think, feasible?

1. Fantaisie Impromptu
2. Op.10 No.3
3. Op.9 No.1
4. Op.69 No.2
5. Op.28 No.4
6. Op.15 No.2
7. Op.Posth No.20
8. Op.28 No.1
9. Op.28 No.13
10. Waltz, No.16

11. Op.37 No.1
12. Op.72 No.1
13. Op.69 No.1
14. Op.64 No.2
15. Op.28 No.15
16. Op.9 No.2
17. Op.27 No.2
18. Op.62 No.2
19. Waltz, Op.18
20. Prelude, Op.45

this is merley a thought at the present time, im not sure how things will turn out in the end.

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monkeydudexd
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« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2011, 10:06:34 PM »

Just a suggestion - i would include a polonaise and/or a scherzo and a sonata instead of just preludes, waltzes, and nocturnes. A 'big' piece besides fantasie impromptu would probably give you a better overall standing. This is just my take from looking at some of the more familiar opus numbers so there may be a polonaise/scherzo/sonata there and i just missed it. Impressive pieces, though, include Polonaise Op 40 No 1, Op 53, Op 61, and Scherzo No. 2 (i forget the op number...). Sonatas are very difficult, but very highly reccomended
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Beethoven Sonata Op. 13 'Pathetique'
Beethoven Sonata Op. 31 No. 2 'Tempest'
Beethoven Sonata Op. 90
Liszt Hungarian Rhapsody No. 17
Bach Italian Concerto
frank_48
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« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2011, 01:04:06 AM »

to be honest i am only about grade 7 standard at playing, and those pieces you mentioned would be too difficult for me, thanks for your input though!
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stevebob
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« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2011, 03:06:17 AM »

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pbryld
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« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2011, 04:14:25 PM »

Why would you make a recital such an expense?

(Is that just what people do?)
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frank_48
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« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2011, 11:29:46 AM »

i just got an email from the venue hire place, advsing me that to hire the joint for a 2 hour concert is $8000 LOLOLOLOLOL!


there goes that dream.. Roll Eyes
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becky8898
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« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2011, 12:33:39 AM »

Hey Frank: Just a thought for the Future.  Get a sponser.  Get a grant.  be creative when your ready. 

Cheers, Becky
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lostinidlewonder
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« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2011, 01:42:42 AM »

i just got an email from the venue hire place, advsing me that to hire the joint for a 2 hour concert is $8000 LOLOLOLOLOL!


there goes that dream.. Roll Eyes
8k is a ridiculous fee for hall hire are you playing in a huge hall which holds thousands of people? With regards to the program, one word comes to my mind which might not be a problem but something you should consider and work out how you speak to your audience to maintain order: "Fragmented".
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frank_48
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« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2011, 02:29:20 AM »

8k is a ridiculous fee for hall hire are you playing in a huge hall which holds thousands of people? With regards to the program, one word comes to my mind which might not be a problem but something you should consider and work out how you speak to your audience to maintain order: "Fragmented".

the hall is quite large, with a steinway of course, maximum capacity is 700 seats.

i was thinking it would only be like 2 or 3 grand but 8k is too much.
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jimbo320
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« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2011, 03:44:25 AM »

Hey Frank.
If you can play those first ten on your list already, then you should have no problem with the rest of it. I'm curious as to why you feel the need to recite all of those. Why tire yourself? Perfecting a shorter but detailed list would be better for your audience.
Don't pay for a hall. If enough people hear you and you do it right. They'll pay you...

Musically, Jimbo 
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pianist1976
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« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2011, 02:03:55 PM »

Some random thoughts, just my very personal opinion, no aim to offend nor to impose my point of view:

I don't like how the pieces are chosen. There's almost no contrast in the character of the pieces. Except for Fantasie-Impromptu, prelude Op 28 nº 1 and Op 18 waltz, almost all the pieces chosen have a slow, calm mood.

And talking about booking that large hall, I don't think it's worth to spend 8.000 bucks (!!!  Shocked  ). It has 700 seats but how many people is going to attend the concert? There are many places where you can play for free before an audience.
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ownedbymusic
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« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2011, 04:00:12 AM »

How many people do you expect to listen to you, and will it be open to public or are you inviting people? If it's open to public, you'd have to do quite a bit of advertising in the first place and be at least slightly well-known in the area for piano. Also, your program is definitely on the easy side (I don't know what grade 7 means), so I don't think you should be giving large recitals at this level. Perhaps a smaller-scale recital with about 30 minutes worth of repertoire would be better - it also wouldn't bore the audience as much since, as mentioned by the previous poster, all your pieces tend to be pretty slow.

Sorry if that was harsh, but you know your own level better than anyone, so if you truly think you can pull off a good recital, by all means go for it. But in my opinion, you should wait a couple more years if you want to give a recital devoted to Chopin - any such recital should include at least one of his major works - a sonata, ballade, scherzo, polonaise, etc.
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Learning:
Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2
Chopin Etude Op. 10 Nos. 2,3,4
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