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A High Tech Pianist for the Future?

“The Visual Recital” is an attempt to help audiences understand and enjoy the syntax of music with visualizations that are scripted and controlled by the musician – a kind of live “Fantasia”, so to speak. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Bach inventions number 1 in C and number 8 in F  (Read 6935 times)
roger_1948
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« on: February 11, 2011, 05:04:19 AM »

Well it finally happened my wife pushed me into posting something. So here goes . Two Bach inventions both very  easy and yet i have worked my tail off on these.  Three and 1/2 years of study and progress comes by inches and sweat. I wonder if I will ever to be able to really play anything before im 70. Leaves me 7 plus years. 

Anyway there played on my brand spanking new Yamaha C7 in my brand spanking new custom studio on the back of my house and recorded on my brand spanking new $7000.00 dollar recording system. At least if my playing isnt very good, my piano and recording equipment  are top notch.  Well without further ado here is what 3 hours a day of constant practice can do for even someone like me. 

Any and all corrections would be appreciated.

Semper Fi, Roger

* Bach invention in C.mp3 (1225.31 KB - downloaded 696 times.)
* Bach invention in F .mp3 (1068.57 KB - downloaded 619 times.)
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Roger

piano sheet music of Invention

piano sheet music of Invention
fleetfingers
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« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2011, 06:57:10 AM »

Wow! Only three and half years of playing piano? I am very impressed! Or...did you mean it took you that long to learn these pieces?

I like the speed of the first one. It could be a little slower, but most people play it too slowly, in my opinion.

Great articulation in the F major and, again, nice tempo. Very even playing, and I didn't hear any mistakes. Your hard work has paid off! Well done!
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johnlewisgrant
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« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2011, 07:20:21 AM »

I have no objection whatsoever to midi creations on sampled pianos, but the result should at least sound convincing.   These inventions, to me, sound exactly like midi on an artificial piano, likely a Yamaha P 33 or some variant.   They need some musicality.

JG
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bbush
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« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2011, 12:21:06 AM »

Roger, these are really well-played!  Glad your wife got you to post, here!

While Bach is not usually my listening or playing choice, I appreciate the technical development playing his works bestows upon a pianist.  I, too am an older player; only took two years of piano in college and had been away from lessons for almost 40 years, until starting again two months ago... and, I think, improving with each passing week.  With your technique, you should NOT be discouraged at all!

I favor the Romantic composers, but there's one Bach piece a friend gave me years ago that I like to (try to) play, called Fuga No. 5.  Sorry that's all the info I have on it, except that it's in C major. I recommend it to you, as I find it more "musical" than the inventions.  And it's certainly within your technical grasp!

Good Luck!
Bruce 
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Romantic aficionado, generally; Alkan lover, specifically.
becky8898
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« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2011, 03:18:09 AM »

Hi - very nicely done. For a rather new student this was done well. I know thats funny im 50 years your junior but your a new student. Well done.  You have plenty of time to add some dynamic flavor to this.  Best of luck with your studies .  and listen to your wife. 

Cheers, Becky
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poolede
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« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2011, 05:12:47 AM »

Roger, I took up piano at age 42 (now 58), but only took lessons for about 3 years.  I tend to play slow pieces (Beethoven, Schumann, Debussy, and a few others), but I really don't PRACTICE, so I never really improve.  My plan was to start taking lessons again at retirement and put in 2 hours a day.  Your story inspires me.  Your Insprirations are terrific and, to my amateur ear, sound perfect.  Keep posting your work.

Doug
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