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Author Topic: Sheet Reading Misshap. Fur Elise?  (Read 8397 times)
lostprophet
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« on: March 07, 2011, 09:27:44 AM »

 I worked out the staves to be DFACE for the Treble and FACEG for the Clef... surely that's not right? It's moved by 5 notes! Shocked

I really want to learn this song until it sounds exactly right, I've been practicing it for a week (starting from almost no experience lol) I have the sheet music for it, I can read it just fine (ie. super slowly lol), but what the? why are my staves all muddled???


While I'm at it, what's a "32nd note C major"? I'm guessing "32nd note" refers to the timing/tempo?
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piano sheet music of Für Elise
lelle
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« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2011, 10:53:18 AM »

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I worked out the staves to be DFACE for the Treble and FACEG for the Clef... surely that's not right? It's moved by 5 notes! Shocked

I don't understand what you mean. Could you specify a bit more what you're talking about? What has "moved 5 notes"?

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why are my staves all muddled???

Muddled? What do you mean? In what way are they muddled?

Quote
While I'm at it, what's a "32nd note C major"? I'm guessing "32nd note" refers to the timing/tempo?

I can't really answer that without you quoting the entire sentence/giving me some kind of context. There is no such thing as 'a "32nd note C major"' to my knowledge

To explain a few of the terms separately though
"C major"  is a "key" (not to be confused with a "key" as in a physical key that you can play on the piano) that in a simplified manner could be explained as a loose definition of what chords and keys a piece of music or a section of a piece of music is played with (there are many "Keys" like a minor, A flat major, f sharp minor, E major etc). C major can also be a specific chord on the piano, where you play the keys C, E and G, and so can a minor, A flat major etc be.

A "32nd note" has indeed like you guessed something to do with the timing. As you might know there are different note values that help you determined how long a certain note should be held in relation to the others. Check this out as a guide: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modern_musical_symbols#Notes_and_rests

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lostprophet
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« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2011, 11:44:51 AM »

Thanks,

I mean the sheet music doesn't seem to follow the E-G-B-D-F pattern on the Treble Clef, it follows a different pattern, one that starts on D, which is 2 notes away (miscounted it before).

It doesn't matter anyway, I think I'm moving onto a different piece, a little easier than Fur Elise. I've been reading around, and from the sounds of things, if you have to decode the sheet music, then the what you're playing is probably too hard for you. That makes sense to me, now I just need to find easier stuff that I like Cheesy

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pianowolfi
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« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2011, 12:01:24 PM »

Thanks,

I mean the sheet music doesn't seem to follow the E-G-B-D-F pattern on the Treble Clef, it follows a different pattern, one that starts on D, which is 2 notes away (miscounted it before).

Haha what is this?  Grin The lines of the treble clef are E-G-B-D-F, the spaces F-A-C-E The lines of the bass clef G-B-D-F-A, the spaces A-C-E-G

Für Elise starts with an E, 4th space in the treble clef. That's the second E above middle C.
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lostprophet
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« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2011, 09:56:17 AM »

 Tongue Okay, I worked out what it was. Somehow I completely messed up the locations of the notes on the keys, when I started playing a while back, and I thought I remembered someone telling me that C is always in between the two black notes... but that's completely wrong. Now my sheet music is all good  Grin
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pianowolfi
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« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2011, 10:14:04 AM »

Tongue Okay, I worked out what it was. Somehow I completely messed up the locations of the notes on the keys, when I started playing a while back, and I thought I remembered someone telling me that C is always in between the two black notes... but that's completely wrong. Now my sheet music is all good  Grin

If this happens to my beginner students I use to make a puzzled face and say: "OMG I think somebody came in here at night and changed the position of the keys!"  Grin
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lostprophet
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« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2011, 10:32:12 AM »

haha, at least I'm not the only one who's ever done that before Smiley

I've been learning where the notes are based on that C for a week, now I have to unwind all of that and re-learn everything. It's no big deal though, I've almost got it down now after going over a couple of beginner friendly pieces.
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