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Aimard’s Bach in Lights

As part of a multimedia project that had never before been attempted, visual artist Alan Warburton created a virtual animation that highlighted not only Bach’s genius but also Warburton’s own creativity. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Ravel, Alborada Del Gracioso, Ariel weiss, piano  (Read 7729 times)
ariel12345
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« on: April 29, 2011, 11:18:30 PM »

Hello all
Here is my performance of the "Alborada", will be happy to have some feedback.
Thank you,
Ariel

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJrG2NwFL0g
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piano sheet music of Alborada del Gracioso
reelypiano
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« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2011, 11:22:02 AM »

Wow.

Just... wow.

My only comment would be that you try not to slow down so much (happens a few places. Nothing too bad. I know it's near impossible.)


....wow.
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meep
ariel12345
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« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2011, 02:01:42 PM »

Thank you very much for your comment. Yes, it was the fastest i could..., tried to match Dinu lipatty's tempo and ended up 40 seconds more:)
Ariel.
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werq34ac
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« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2011, 02:51:34 AM »

I'm currently learning this..


Thoughts:
Perhaps you should make more obvious changes of color?
Don't let the accents slow you down! And I know that those repeated notes are hard, but Ravel himself said "I don't care how you play them, JUST DON"T SLOW THEM DOWN."
Good energy in the first part. Good tone for the recitivo, Perhaps listen more and really enjoy the sound you are creating? The 3/4 part should be the same tempo as the beginning, I think it was just a tad slower than it should have been. Really listen to the sound you are creating. The accents should not be harsh, rather they are more like very heavy tenutos. It's interesting how fast you play the a tempos.. is this on purpose?
When the rhyhmic part comes back, good energy, but it still lacks rhythmic tightness. In the 2nd to last page, you need more changes of color. The piece seems to continually change character and you need to portray this.


In general, very good! the notes are solid, and you are shaping the piece musically. Good tone, but it could be even better if you really listened and enjoyed the sound you are creating.
In general, it lacked rhythmic tightness. Although you did have good energy (despite the slower speed), the rhythmic vitality will give it an extra boost. There are places where you can stretch the tempo however.
The tremolos sound very deliberate, and personally, I don't think that is the right sound you should be creating. Think of a guitar tremolo. If you've never seen a guitar do a tremolo before, look up Alahambra Fantasy (or something like that). It should be a little softer in my opinion(as in articulation, your dynamics were good).
Also, it lacked color. This piece is very colorful, yes? You need to be more sensitive to when the color changes and you need to portray this. Everything seemed to be played with one color (apart from the middle section). Does that make sense?

And since this is my opinion and not the fact (even if I do believe these things) you do not have to accept it and anything you don't agree with you can reject.
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Ravel Jeux D'eau
Brahms 118/2
Liszt Concerto 1
Rachmaninoff/Kreisler Liebesleid
arielpiano
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« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2011, 06:27:29 PM »

Awesome, Ariel. Three cheers. So is the Poulenc, BTW.
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rachfan
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« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2011, 12:35:28 AM »

Hi Ariel,

An excellent rendition.  Congrats!

David
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Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities.
pianoplayjl
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« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2011, 02:38:27 AM »

Wow, nice execution of this piece. I think you handled the repeated notes in the middle part very well. Well done!
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Funny? How? How am I funny?
ariel12345
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« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2012, 11:55:55 PM »

Hi All!
I am sorry, I didn't know there are new posts here! Thanks a lot for your reviews:)
This recording is finished and I'm happy with it. I'm sure it's not perfect but it is fine for me.

Arielpiano (thumbs up for the name:), What Poulenc? the 2 pianos? that's not me playing, I filmed it.
Thanks all for the nice comments:)
Ariel
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starstruck5
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« Reply #8 on: May 02, 2012, 01:59:20 PM »

The playing is great, but I thought the lighting was a bit on the dark side!
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When a search is in progress, something will be found.
ariel12345
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« Reply #9 on: May 03, 2012, 01:10:53 AM »

The playing is great, but I thought the lighting was a bit on the dark side!

Well, look at the light here: Smiley

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jg762aSXYkE      (contain some artistic nudity)

I shot it, and played the Ave Maria also:)

Thanks!
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iratior
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« Reply #10 on: May 03, 2012, 03:58:05 AM »

I was particularly impressed by (and jealous of) the double-note glissandi.  Being as I am double-jointed, I could drag my fingers across the keyboard and get hardly any more sound than if I'd tried to use wet noodles to do it.  The repeated notes are less intimidating;  I can conceive of working up to them by doing plenty of repeated-note exercises within pieces by Liszt or even by Scarlatti.  I've also discovered, being left-handed, that playing the repeated notes with my left hand helps the right hand "know" what to do to play them.  On the subject of tempo, I don't think I'd feel "authorized" to make it so variable.  In more than one place, Ravel does write
"tres rhythme", and I take that to mean that a little dancing to the music would not be out of the question.  To bring out the best in the piece, I think that its context could be instructive.   The English title is "Dawn Song of the Court Jester", so we have to imagine what it might have been like to be famously good at being such a person, in a time and place far from our own.  In this piece, it is as if the jester's triumph comes by way of retelling a joke.  The first time, it is distinctly risque;  the chords turn ominously dissonant;  what the jester has done comes across as perilously close to disrespect for the monarch.  To accentuate this mood, at measure 102 or thereabouts, I would strive to make the chord with the F#, E# and G suddenly louder.  The second time the joke is told, the punch line is different enough so that we get the impression that the jester has done a fabulous job defusing what had been a volatile situation;  the crowd knows it and laughs with delight.  But at the end of the piece, the inverted ninth chord relative to B minor returns, suggesting that the occupation of the court jester will always be fraught with risk;  in a tragic way, he is always walking a tightrope.
So thanks, Ariel, for the performance.
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ariel12345
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« Reply #11 on: May 03, 2012, 07:32:19 PM »

Thanks Iratior, for your comments,
It's great to have various sources for inspiration including harmony analyzation and imagination. But keep in mind that imagination could vary a lot from person to person.
Ariel 
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