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Author Topic: 2 vs 3  (Read 2073 times)
bartleson
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« on: June 08, 2011, 10:39:07 PM »

Any ideas for an intermediate piece tackling 2 against 3?  I have checked Czerny and Burmuller.   Is there a piece by Heller that might work?
Thanks!
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pianisten1989
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« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2011, 02:07:33 PM »

I think quite many sonatas by Mozart has got a few 3/2 places. Though, if you want more exercise-like, I'm sure Czerny wrote something about it...
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pianowolfi
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« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2011, 02:51:59 PM »

You might try Mad Rush by Philipp Glass.
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aintgotnorhythm
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« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2011, 02:58:37 PM »

Opening Piece from Glassworks by Philip Glass has 2 vs 3 throughout. The notes are very simple to play and for an intermediate player this would be a pure 2 vs 3 exercise.

Or you might try a short passage from a piece, e.g.

Rachmaninov 1st piano concerto 2nd movement, e.g. the 8 bars starting around bar 30 are 2 vs. 3 and in my view playable by an intermediate player,

or Beethoven Sonata in F Minor Op 2 no 1 around bars 168-172

you could probably just loop round either of these to make it into an exercise.
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pianowolfi
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« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2011, 03:03:13 PM »

Opening Piece from Glassworks by Philip Glass has 2 vs 3 throughout. The notes are very simple to play and for an intermediate player this would be a pure 2 vs 3 exercise.


Oh yeah that's what I actually meant, sorry, I confused it.
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spencervirt
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« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2011, 03:40:37 PM »

Chopin's second nouvelle etude would be great for you. It is an etude on 2 vs 3 and is also very beautiful. The notes shouldn't be difficult (i'm not sure what level you are) but the getting the hang of 2 vs. 3 will be, which is what you want anyway! This is allegedly the last piece that Liszt played before he died.

Give it a listen.

That's Ronsenthal. You can't go wrong with him.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZItBrjyy0PY&feature=related
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michael_langlois
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« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2011, 02:03:46 AM »

You can always teach scales with one hand doing eighths, and the other triplets.  That's how I learned two against three (and three against two), three against four, and was able to move into more advanced polyrhythmia.  It's basically learning to hear both at the same time.

Mike
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pianisten1989
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« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2011, 05:34:25 AM »

Yeah, that's probably the best way...
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drkilroy
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« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2012, 04:24:31 PM »

Debussy's Arabesque no. 1 is also an example of piece using quite a lot of 3:2 polyrhythm.

Best regards, Dr
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j_menz
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« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2012, 02:53:48 AM »

I'd recommend the Debussy Arabesque as well.  Years ago, this was the piece that forced me to really "get" polyrhythms. Rather than using maths or cute phrases or whatever, this is the piece that taght me to hear and play both lines seperately at once. Never looked back.

(*looks for other pieces which might fix the myriad remaining weaknesses*)
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