Piano Forum logo
May 26, 2017, 03:01:34 PM *
   Forum Home   Help Search  


Piano Technique – the Leschetizky Method

This legendary manual in both English and German documents principles and techniques of the legendary piano teacher Theodor Leschetizky, who taught Paderewski, Schnabel and many other great pianists. Read more >>

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Beethoven, Op. 26, Sonata #12, 3rd and 4th Mvts.  (Read 3431 times)
gvans
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 403


« on: January 27, 2012, 04:55:54 AM »

When Louis v. B. died in 1827, they played the funeral march from Op. 26 through the streets of Vienna. It was the only piano sonata movement LVB personally orchestrated. The trio is complete with drum rolls and pistol shots.

* Beethoven_Op.26_Mvt.3.mp3 (5691.87 KB - downloaded 64 times.)
* Beethoven_Op.26_Mvt.4.mp3 (4166.91 KB - downloaded 36 times.)
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

pianoplayjl
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 2071


« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2012, 11:56:14 PM »

I only listened to the 3rd movment since it is my favourite. Not too badly played but some spots can do with a little more cleaning. Can't give you advice since I haven't learnt this piece. But a very good effort overall, arguably the hardest movment of the whole sonata speaking in terms of musicality. Good luck.

JL
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Funny? How? How am I funny?
rachfan
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 3027


« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2012, 03:56:46 AM »

Hi gvans,

I listened to this sonata twice.  Over the years I've played perhaps a half-dozen of the Beethoven sonatas, so I'm hardly an expert; however, I believe you you've  presented a fine rendition here. You articulate the music very well, devote much attention to musicality, and your playing is expressive throughout.  For me it's certainly a convincing performance.  Beethoven is not an easy composer to play and is always confronting the pianist with different complexities.  You meet these challenges with musicianship and artistry.  Thanks for posting your recording!

David
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities.
gvans
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 403


« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2012, 05:21:43 PM »

Thanks, pianoplayjl and rachfan, for your kind comments. Yes, the funeral march is something. There is a great recording of the ending of the movement by Svatislav Richter ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQcFAmddL9I ) you might check out.

Watching SR's facial expressions alone is amazing. I think the key is not playing it too slowly. I might have gone crazy with the dynamics, like Richter does (did they name the earthquake scale after his playing?) but I didn't want to knock out the fresh tuning on my piano, having lots of work to do before the next tune.

The ambiguous interplay between major and minor, something Brahms took later and amplified, forms the heart of Beethoven's grapple with the mystery of death. Nobody likes the idea of the unknown, of the grand void--but for sure, the "heartache and the thousand natural shocks flesh is heir to" will be gone. Those grand shifts to B-major and A-major during the theme presentation somehow make the concept of obliteration bearable.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  


Need more info or help?


Search pianostreet.com - the web's largest resource of information about piano playing:



 
Jump to:  


Most popular classical piano composers:
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

o