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Indian Classical Music (Read 4353 times)

Offline 49410enrique

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Indian Classical Music
« on: April 19, 2012, 07:33:08 PM »
this is so freakin cool, i mean how awesome would it be to get to attend this class, and study non-western (tonality system) based North Indian classical music with the man who is perhaps regarded as the greatest living musician of the genre?

well i think it's pretty cool at least.


http://news.stanford.edu/news/2012/april/sarod-maestro-khan-041812.html

i think it speaks volumes in wonderful way about the music dept at stanford, incredible open mindedness and creative thought, what a wonderful learning environment it must be!

Offline ted

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Re: Indian Classical Music
«Reply #1 on: April 19, 2012, 11:29:08 PM »
I completely agree. I listen to many different varieties of world music and find it deepens and broadens my personal piano improvisation immensely. Classical Chinese music on the guzheng moves me very profoundly, as does Beijing Opera. I was at a piano party and one of the guests set up a guzheng, which I ended up listening to and ignoring the people playing the Fazioli !

Of course the big difference in all this music is the importance of improvisation, which liberates us from the four-square restrictions of notation, especially in the matter of rhythm. Western music has been hamstrung by notation for centuries. What started out as an approximate way of graphically representing sound, which is all notation really is, gradually came to be a musical objective in itself. The fact is that the most moving rhythms and phrasing cannot be written out at all. Improvisation is not a sort of poor man's composition, quite the contrary. Written composition is a rather poor visual approximation of improvisation.

Jarrett's immense contribution to my mind lies, not in the actual musical content of what he plays, but in his global statement, "Look everybody, it's all right to improvise freely after all". Jarrett's improvisation is very close to the spirit of Indian and other world music.

Mind you, I think I am overly optimistic. There still exists colossal bias against these things. But as you say, it's a big step forward that some educational institutions are seeing the light. At least it's a start.
"We're all bums when the wagon comes." - Waller

Offline 49410enrique

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Re: Indian Classical Music
«Reply #2 on: April 20, 2012, 01:01:34 AM »
fanstastic post ted. makes me think a bit more about this.... thanks!

Offline 49410enrique

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Re: Indian Classical Music
«Reply #3 on: April 23, 2012, 09:23:16 PM »
new upload

Offline cadenza14224

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Re: Indian Classical Music
«Reply #4 on: May 24, 2012, 03:33:40 AM »
This is awesome. The fusion of East and West is really unique and exotic!

If you enjoy this, you should definitely check out the Sitar Concertos for Sitar and Orchestra by Ravi Shankar and some of his Western Classical Colleauges, and his collaborations with Yehudi Menuhin.

Offline cuberdrift

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Re: Indian Classical Music
«Reply #5 on: June 01, 2012, 04:57:45 AM »
Shankar's album with Menuhin might help  :D

Offline pytheamateur

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Re: Indian Classical Music
«Reply #6 on: June 01, 2012, 09:26:41 AM »
If anyone knows any Indian piano music, please share.  It would be most interesting to play it.
Beethoven - Sonata in C sharp minor, Op 27 No 12
Chopin - Fantasie Impromptu, Nocturn in C sharp minor, Op post
Brahms - Op 118, Nos 2 & 3

Offline 49410enrique

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this is pretty amazing too!


Performed by Yu Hongmei 于红

Associate Professor of Department of Traditional Chinese Music, the Central Conservatory of Music (CCM); Guest Soloist of the China Central Chinese Orchestra; Guest Professor at the University of Calgary, Canada.

Yu Hongmei began her erhu study at the age of eight, and she studied at the Attached High School of the ChinaCentral Music University and then the China Central Music University where she earned her Bachelor's and Master's degree. At the university she was taught by professors including Zhang Shao, Su Anguo, Lan Yusong and Liu Changfu; she also learned Banhu, Gaohu, Jinghu, Zhuihu and other national musical instruments with some masters.