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Topic: Tips on where to go next?  (Read 1872 times)

Offline Azazel

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Tips on where to go next?
on: September 29, 2004, 05:45:36 AM
Ok, I've been playing for awhile, but only started to get really serious a few months ago. I learned the first movement of Moonlight sonata, and I also know the first prelude from WTC (quite a workout that one, lol). I have the first book of WTC, and I was wondering if there are any fugues in it that aren't too hard. Also, any suggestions on pieces I could start building a repertior with? Thanks a bunch.

Offline donjuan

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Re: Tips on where to go next?
Reply #1 on: September 29, 2004, 06:23:28 AM
Maybe you would like to have a look at the 2nd movement of the moonlight sonata.  I find it very luminous and comforting to listen to.  

It's good you play Bach- I am trying to enjoy Bach, but find it very difficult to get motivated to work hard.  You have been playing probably the easiest Bach piece in existence.  Check out some pieces from the "Anna Magdalena Notebook" and see if you find anything appealing..
Fugues are pretty tough..Get more familiar with the keyboard and improve sightreading before formally "starting" it.  The reason why I think you should move slow is because you consider the 1st prelude "quite a workout".  
If I were you however, I would be badly itching to play something from the romantic age-Schumman, Chopin, Liszt, Schubert..
donjuan

Offline Azazel

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Re: Tips on where to go next?
Reply #2 on: September 29, 2004, 06:33:41 AM
Wasn't exaclty serious about the first prelude being a workout, sarcasm doesn't go to well when its just plain text, huh? After learning the first prelude I said to myself, "hmm, this book shouldn't be too hard" and decided to try the first fugue, and basically shat my pants. Thanks for responding though.

Offline Azazel

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Re: Tips on where to go next?
Reply #3 on: September 30, 2004, 01:19:50 AM
Anyone else? There are a hell of a lot of pieces out there, pretty mind boggling trying to figure out where to start.

Offline sharon_f

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Re: Tips on where to go next?
Reply #4 on: September 30, 2004, 01:42:12 AM
You really should learn the Preludes and Fugues in the WTC  together as a set. And you're right, although the 1st prelude is the easiest technically, the fugue is another matter.  Arguably the easiest "set" is number #2 in C minor. The prelude is not terribly difficult technically and the fugue is probably the most accessible in the set. And quiet "cheery" despite the minor key.

You might want to look at one of the easier Haydn sonatas and easier Chopin Preludes or Waltzes.

Do you have a teacher? He or she could advise you best.
There are two means of refuge from the misery of life - music and cats.
Albert Schweitzer

Offline bernhard

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Re: Tips on where to go next?
Reply #5 on: September 30, 2004, 01:46:26 AM
If you want to try your hand at a very beautiful fugue by J.S. Bach and yet pretty manageable, try his “Little Prelude in D” BWV 925. In spite of its title, this is really a short fugue with subject and answer, the works!

The 2 and 3 voice inventions (some are real masterpieces) are the best introduction to the WTC.

The easiest fugue in the WTC is no. 15 (Book 2) in G. It is still difficult.

Have a look here for a list of all the 48 preludes and fugues in progressive order of difficulty.

https://www.pianoforum.net/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=stud;action=display;num=1082738838

Have a look here for some repertory suggestions.

https://www.pianoforum.net/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=teac;action=display;num=1092594417;start=4
(beginners pieces)

https://www.pianoforum.net/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=repo;action=display;num=1092268957;start=6
(Liszt easy pieces)

https://www.pianoforum.net/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=repo;action=display;num=1073648526
(Shostakovitch preludes op. 34)

https://www.pianoforum.net/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=repo;action=display;num=1072700505
(Haunting nocturnal pieces)

https://www.pianoforum.net/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=repo;action=display;num=1077534930
(Barber)

https://www.pianoforum.net/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=repo;action=display;num=1093181180;start=0
(easy show-off pieces)

https://www.pianoforum.net/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=repo;action=display;num=1077145772
(Scarlatti sonatas)

https://www.pianoforum.net/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=repo;action=display;num=1077625353
(modern pieces, not too difficult, 7 minutes length)

https://www.pianoforum.net/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=repo;action=display;num=1089664585;start=2
(intermediate repertory)

https://www.pianoforum.net/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=teac;action=display;num=1061212155
(Grieg)

https://www.pianoforum.net/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=stud;action=display;num=1077907916
(Scarlatti & Prokofiev)

(Just the tip of the iceberg). ;)

So, where to go next? To a piece you love, of course. :D

Best wishes,
Bernhard.
The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side. (Hunter Thompson)

Offline chopiabin

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Re: Tips on where to go next?
Reply #6 on: September 30, 2004, 05:09:30 AM
It's really good that you started with Bach - keep it up. I just got a new teacher who was completely dismayed by the fact that I had never played anything by Bach and he asked me to memorize two 2 part inventions by the next week. The great thing about Bach (besides the music) is that it teaches you how to play 2 different textures and melodies at the same time.  Now that I'm learning some, I am actually starting to enjoy Bach.

Offline Antnee

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Re: Tips on where to go next?
Reply #7 on: September 30, 2004, 05:27:37 AM
Yes, as chop said, kudos on the bach, and you're right, that prelude is one of bach's easiest pieces from that book. The rest are not easy! But once you get bach down he's amazingly fun to play. Bach is also incredible for learning to get your hand and finger independence, especially from the inventions.

As Bernhard mentioned in one of his links, Scarlatti is also quite useful and his sonatas are amazing! Check him out too!
"The trouble with music appreciation in general is that people are taught to have too much respect for music they should be taught to love it instead." -  Stravinsky

Offline Tash

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Re: Tips on where to go next?
Reply #8 on: September 30, 2004, 05:52:14 AM
i agree with the prelude and fugue in C minor- played it last year and it's pretty easy cos there's only 3 voices and the prelude isn't that difficult either. and it's fun to play as well so that's a nice bonus!
'J'aime presque autant les images que la musique' Debussy
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