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what do you guys think about teach your self piano (Read 4189 times)

Offline pianolady

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what do you guys think about teach your self piano
« on: January 27, 2003, 09:39:29 PM »
i have a book about teach your self piano what do you guys think about that kind of book is it the right thing to go by or should you go with a teacher that teach you piano

Offline Chris_Rossoni

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Re: what do you guys think about teach your self p
«Reply #1 on: January 28, 2003, 01:30:43 AM »
independence is always a good thing but,  many great musicians always have had a teacher in there younger years to lay a foundation, but usually after that you teacher yourself and it is alot of trial and error.   So about your book.  I would say get a teacher to lay a foundation and later maybe go independent and learn use trial and error.   I don't know if this answered your question.  I am very tired today

Offline tosca1

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Re: what do you guys think about teach your self p
«Reply #2 on: January 28, 2003, 11:48:51 AM »
A few very great pianists have been self-taught but there are cogent reasons why it is preferable to have a teacher. A good teacher will inspire you to do better and help you discover new depths in the music that you play. A good teacher will provide a critical ear and encourage the development of a refined musical intelligence and taste.  
One of the chief dangers of working without a teacher is the formation of sloppy habits in playing such as over-pedalling, poor posture and a crude technique.
Teaching yourself the piano is like working in a vacuum and as human beings we learn best when we interact with others.

Offline Le-ackt

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Re: what do you guys think about teach your self p
«Reply #3 on: January 30, 2003, 07:34:46 AM »
I dont have a private teacher , But i plan to go to college for music .
I think if you really arnt able to have a teacher or have a teacher that arnt really helpful . Then read more book who wrote by Virtuoso , their opinions are indeed will benefit in any cases .And even buy your favorite pianoist's concert video ( i know , for classical concert is much harder to find than a rock concert) .
well , I m self taught too , and i know how hard it is . But is the same if you arnt self motivate even if you got Chopin or Liszt be your master . 8)

Offline pianolady

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Re: what do you guys think about teach your self p
«Reply #4 on: January 31, 2003, 05:20:34 AM »
well you i have a teacher and he is a good teacher for me he has me working on the keybord  with my piano and that is hard to mach them to gatter and work it all in but i do it some how i dont know how i do it but it works for me  ::)

Offline Rachmanoinoff

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Re: what do you guys think about teach your self p
«Reply #5 on: February 16, 2003, 08:25:26 AM »
I think it's great!  I teach myself, and I love it!!!
Music is music, don't try to tamper with it

Offline rachfan

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Re: what do you guys think about teach your self p
«Reply #6 on: February 16, 2003, 09:34:46 PM »
There are a few immortals like Hoffmann who did not study formally for long and went on to careers and greatness.  For most, working with a teacher will help them progress immeasurably.  The big difference is discipline.  When working alone, sloppiness, bad habits, and a tolerance of same can creep in quickly.  When working with a teacher, especially in the younger years, steps are taken to ensure a balanced approach to technique, musicianship,  and repertoire.  In the case of serious students, there are specific goals to be met--auditions, recitals, competitions, etc.  Social pianists are given more modest goals, but goals nonetheless.  

The teacher is an astute observer and listener who explains, critiques, demonstrates and inspires  (and sometimes demands!).  The student, therefore, works harder.  In the case of a very advanced pianist, the student doesn't need a teacher as much as a piano coach to concentrate on the finest points of interpretation.  By the way, because learning is a lifelong pursuit, it might surprise you to know that many teachers (perhaps your own) often have teachers.  That is, they continue to work with distinguished faculty at conservatories and university schools of music or performing artists.  They understand better than most how valuable it is to have a critic and mentor in one's corner--whether or not one is fully capable of studying and practicing alone.  
Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities.