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Topic: Learning chords  (Read 1503 times)

Smurfet

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Learning chords
on: September 30, 2004, 06:25:58 PM
Hello, I am new here.  I am an adult beginner and have always wanted to play the piano and i finally have an opportunity to begin my study.  Does anybody have a good strategy for learning all of the chords?

I tried a search but couldn't find.

Thankx  :-*

Offline Seaside_Lee

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Re: Learning chords
Reply #1 on: September 30, 2004, 11:19:26 PM
Hello Smurfett

Just out of interest as a beginner... why would you want to "learn all the chords" at first?

To get you started

Each scale had 3 major chords
the I, IV & V

in the C scale that would be :-

C Chord  C G E
F Chord  F A C
& G chord G B D

to make them minor chords flatten the middle note (the 3rd)

stacking 3rds onto those would give you a 7th 9th 11th & 13th

eg
       
C E G.B.D.F.A

then there is dominant, diminished, augmented chords etc etc.

Let us know how much you know already and I am sure someone will be able to point you in the right direction :)

Let me know if that helps?


Lee



 


Lee
I am back tickling the ivories after a thirty year hiatus...playing by ear and having fun !

Smurfet

  • Guest
Re: Learning chords
Reply #2 on: October 01, 2004, 12:14:04 AM
Yes Lee it was helpful.

I know how to build triads -is that how you call them?- but I not very good on automatic pilot.  I can figer out how to build a major or minor chord but it's not automatic.  I always hear people talking about needing to learn all the chords until it is automatic.  And that this is very important to play piano.  I have a book that says all them, but how do I remember them and do them quick?  

Are knowing chords on automatic actually that important to play piano well?

Smurfett  :-*

Offline monk

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Re: Learning chords
Reply #3 on: October 01, 2004, 12:40:48 AM
Smurfett, I know the secret! After applying it, you will be able to play all chords automatically.
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PRACTICE!!!

Yes, you have to practice.
To play the chords in different keys over and over each day.
Of course perhaps not only "naked", but nicely wrapped in exercises or pieces. Be creative, play the chords in different sequences, e.g. always a minor second higher or through the cycle of fifth or...

You want too much too fast.

Best Wishes,
Monk

Offline bernhard

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The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side. (Hunter Thompson)

Offline rlefebvr

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Re: Learning chords
Reply #5 on: October 01, 2004, 05:13:35 AM

The best way to learn chords is to play them up and down the piano with all the inversions.

Learn them in the same sequence as the circle of fifths.
Do all the majors
Then learn all the minors
and so on and so on.

Try do do the circle without moving your hands much, getting you to recognize the different inversions.

You are ready for each level when you can change chords on demand every second.

Also, get a book of music with chords on top and simply practice those at the level you are at. Ex. Just play them as major chords if that is all you know until you get further ahead.

As for Monk, he is right but he is also on his period this month, so don't mind his rhetoric
Ron Lefebvre

 Ron Lefebvre © Copyright. Any reproduction of all or part of this post is sheer stupidity.
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