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Step-by-step tutorial to covering music on piano (Read 1637 times)

Offline grandbrand

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Step-by-step tutorial to covering music on piano
« on: October 10, 2012, 12:13:12 AM »
Hello,
from my Youtube experience I learned that people keep asking for sheet music for covers you play forever.

So I decided to teach them how to actually cover music.

http://www.musiccube.blogspot.com - there you will find my tutorial, to be continued.

I'm sharing this blog with my friends, but you can easily find all my posts.

Offline birba

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Re: Step-by-step tutorial to covering music on piano
«Reply #1 on: October 10, 2012, 05:24:15 AM »
Excuse my dumb question, but what are "covers" and how do you "cover" music?

Offline danhuyle

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Re: Step-by-step tutorial to covering music on piano
«Reply #2 on: October 10, 2012, 05:47:55 AM »
Excuse my dumb question, but what are "covers" and how do you "cover" music?

You playing a known piece like it's supposed to sound. Much like people doing covers of Beethoven Sonatas or any other piece in the piano repertoire.

Perfection itself is imperfection.

Currently practicing
Albeniz Triana
Scriabin Fantaisie Op28
Scriabin All Etudes Op8

Offline birba

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Re: Step-by-step tutorial to covering music on piano
«Reply #3 on: October 10, 2012, 12:23:43 PM »
Sorry, still doesn't make sense.  At least not in the way it was presented.  "teach them how to actually cover music."  "sheet covers you play".  Nope.  Don't get it.

Offline zezhyrule

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Re: Step-by-step tutorial to covering music on piano
«Reply #4 on: October 10, 2012, 02:11:50 PM »
A "cover" is usually referring to popular music. It just means a new recording by someone other than the band who wrote it.

Doesn't really work in the classical realm. 
Currently learning -

- Bach: P&F in F Minor (WTC 2)
- Chopin: Etude, Op. 25, No. 5
- Beethoven: Sonata, Op. 31, No. 3
- Scriabin: Two Poems, Op. 32
- Debussy: Prelude Bk II No. 3

Offline grandbrand

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Re: Step-by-step tutorial to covering music on piano
«Reply #5 on: October 10, 2012, 02:21:03 PM »
Sorry, still doesn't make sense.  At least not in the way it was presented.  "teach them how to actually cover music."  "sheet covers you play".  Nope.  Don't get it.

I was just typing exactly what zezhyrule has said.

It is a term referring to playing popular music by ear. Sometimes it's a full band cover, sometimes you cover a song piano solo for example.

No meaning in the classical realm, however it works as a decent ear training method :)

Cheers! :)

Offline 49410enrique

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Re: Step-by-step tutorial to covering music on piano
«Reply #6 on: October 10, 2012, 08:14:09 PM »
Sorry, still doesn't make sense.  At least not in the way it was presented.  "teach them how to actually cover music."  "sheet covers you play".  Nope.  Don't get it.
you're okay!
oh happy happy day!

Offline ajspiano

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Re: Step-by-step tutorial to covering music on piano
«Reply #7 on: October 15, 2012, 01:56:53 AM »
Excuse my dumb question, but what are "covers" and how do you "cover" music?

Glad to see you back fine sir!

I don't feel that dan's explanation is quite right -  "cover" versions are not necessarily "how a piece is supposed to sound".

A cover band (to put it in context) means one that plays other peoples music rather than their own. However contemporary artists that generally perform their own works, may also "cover" a song by another artist either by reproducing the original version, or reinventing the work to make it their own - such as if I were to make a jazz version of a chopin piece for example by altering the rhythm to a swing feel and replacing the LH with a walking bass (but leaving the melody and underlying harmony as written).

Technically as classical artists we are always "covering" the great composers.

However, in the sense of what the OP is saying (without viewing his post)..  What I suspect it means is "figure out the melody, and the underlying harmonic structure - arrange your own version of the piece" as applied to a great many pop songs and plastered allover youtube, probably by the OP himself, who is now sick of having people ask him to write out the scores for all his arrangements.